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Upper School Curriculum

English/Language Arts

English 7
Course Description: This course includes the study of grammar, literary devices, and research writing. The course also includes a study of literature, including poetry, short stories, plays, and novels. Literature is used to sharpen reading skills, develop vocabulary, and improve comprehension and identification of literary elements such as theme, plot, characterization, and figurative language. Students will write book reports, themes, creative assignments, and reader’s response to the literature. The major feature of 7th Grade Language Arts is the class production of Shakespeare at a local theatre. Texts: Title:                    Perinne’s Literature, 8th Edition Author:               Thomas R. Arp & Greg Johnson Publisher:          Heinle & Heinle, 2002 Title:                    Tales of Ancient Egypt Author:               Roger Lancelyn Green Publisher:          Puffin Books, 1987 Title:                    The Egypt Game Author:               Zilpha Keatley Snyder Publisher:          Yearling Books, 1986 Title:                    The Outsiders Author:               S. E. Hinton Publisher:          Puffin Books, 1995 Title:                    Romeo & Juliet Author:               William Shakespeare Publisher:          Washington Square Press, 1992 Title:                    Romiette & Julio Author:               Sharon Draper Publisher:          Simon Pulse, 1999 Title:                    The House on Mango Street Author:               Sandra Cisneros Publisher:          Vintage Books, 1991 Title:                    Out of the Dust Author:               Karen Hesse Publisher:          Scholastic, 1999 Title:                    So Far from the Bamboo Grove Author:               Yoko Kawashima Watkins Publisher:          Beech Tree Paperbacks, 1986 Title:                    The Sign of the Chrysanthemum Author:               Katherine Paterson Publisher:          Harper Collins, 1988 Title:                    A Single Shard Author:               Linda Sue Park Publisher:          Yearling, 2001 Title:                    Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry Author:               Mildred Taylor Publisher:          Bantam Books, 1989 Title:                    The Giver Author:               Lois Lowry Publisher:          Bantam Books, 1993 Various poems and short stories Units of Study:
  1. Ancient Egypt
  2. Growing Up
  3. My True Self
  4. Poetry and Literary Devices
  5. Short Stories
  6. Writing a Research Paper
  7. Grammar and Parts of Speech
  8. Shakespeare Production
English 8
Course Description: Eighth Grade Language Arts strives to provide an environment that will foster students’ appreciation for the nature, structure, and power of our language while connecting them to the world beyond classroom walls. Students closely examine diverse texts, write in a variety of styles and genres, engage in small and whole-class discussions, and use technology to expand their learning and to find audiences for their work. Eighth grade writers focus on creativity, clarity, and thorough development of their ideas, as well as complete an MLA style research paper in preparation for their Washington DC class trip. Texts: Title: Light in the Forest Author: Conrad Ricter Publisher: Permabound Title: Fever 1793 Author: Laurie Hulse Anderson Publisher: Simon Shuster Title: Call of the Wild Author: Jack London Publisher: Permabound Title: Criss Cross Author: Lynn Rae Perkins Publisher: Harper Collins Various Novels, Drama, and Poetry Units of Study:
  1. Vocabulary: Students will study vocabulary from literature and other unit texts.
  2. Reading: Several of the literature texts aim to reinforce the eighth grade social studies curriculum, American History from Exploration to the Reconstruction. Also through the SSR program students read independently and in class to complete the year-long program.
  3. Writing: through the journal and other formal writing assignments, students will explore and apply basic techniques of composition including thesis development, paragraph development, and synthesis. Creative writing projects include narrative, descriptive, and expository writings.
  4. Writing Conventions: through the grammar curriculum, students will study basic grammar.
  5. Research: Students will write a comprehensive MLA paper on an subject of American history.
  6. Oral and Visual Communication: Through formal and informal public speaking assignment, students will practice effective presentation and verbal communication techniques.
English 9: World Literature
Course Description: The World Literature curriculum is designed to offer students a historical overview of World Literature selections in a variety of genres. Mythology, drama, poetry, short stories, novels, and plays will be read and analyzed. Literature is selected thematically. The composition component of this course emphasizes structure and effective language and will include a variety of creative and expository writing experiences, including research. Students will have the opportunity to develop their own voice through a variety of genres. Texts: Title: Greek Mythology for Teens Author: Zachary Hamby Publisher: Prufrock Press, 2011 Title: Medea Author: Euripedes Publisher: Penguin Books, 1963 Title: Oedipus the King Author: Sophocles Publisher: Simon & Shuster, 2005 Title: Shakespeare Made Easy: Julius Caesar Author: William Shakespeare / Durband Publisher: Baron’s, 1984 Title: The Metamorphosis Author: Franz Kafka Publisher: Bantam Books, 1972 Title: Waiting for Godot Author: Samuel Beckett Publisher: Grove Press, 1982 Title: Ficciones Author: Jose Luis Borges Publisher: Grove Press, 1962 Title: Strange Pilgrims Author: Gabriel Garcia Marquez Publisher: Vintage Books, 1993 Title: Fahrenheit 451 Author: Ray Bradbury Publisher: Simon & Shuster, 1995 Title: Cyrano de Bergerac Author: Edmond Rostand Publisher: Bantam Classics, 1988 Title: Night Author: Elie Wiesel Publisher: Hill and Wang, 2006 Title: Persepolis Author: Marjane Satrapi Publisher: Pantheon, 2003 Title: Maus, A Survivor’s Tale Author: Art Spiegelman Publisher: Pantheon, 1986 Units of Study: 1. Ancient Tales
  • Greek Mythology
  • Ancient Greek Tragedies
2. Strange & Supernatural
  • Magical Realism
  • Existentialism
  • Dante’s Inferno
3. The Need for Change 4. War 5. Writing a Compare/Contrast Research Paper
English 10: American Literature
Course Description: As students face a pivotal time in their academic lives, English 10 presents an exploration of the themes and achievements of American authors, as well as a study of those literacy and communication skills necessary for effective performance in students'  broadening academic world. Texts: Title: Grammar Usage and Mechanics Workbook, Level 10 (Blue) Publisher: McDougall Littell Title: The American Experience Publisher: Prentice Hall Title: The Stories of Edgar Allen Poe Author: Edgar Allen Poe Publisher: Simon Shuster Title: The  Mysterious Stranger and Other Stories Author: Mark Twain Publisher: Signet Classic Title: Of Mice and Men Author: John Steinbeck Publisher: Turtleback Title: The Short Stories of Ernest Hemingway Author: Ernest Hemingway Publisher: Simon Shuster Title: Old Man and the Sea Author: Ernest Hemingway Publisher: Permabound Title: Catcher in the Rye Author: J. D. Salinger Publisher: Turtleback Title: To Kill a Mockingbird Author: Harper Lee Publisher: Turtleback Title: Short Fiction Classic and Contemporary Author: Charles Bohner and Lyman Grant, editors Publisher: Prentice Hall Units of Study:
  1. Literature: The American Literature curriculum features novels, poetry, drama, and non-fiction selections. Students will explore the literary achievements and historical contexts in which the texts were written, as well as perform close reading of texts, analyzing authors’ use of literary devices including figurative language, tone, diction, and structure.
  2. Composition: Students will study a variety of compositional forms, including literary analysis, the personal essay, and the 6 point ACT essay.
  3. Research: Students will complete short MLA style synthesis papers using both primary source literature texts and secondary source literary analysis.
  4. Grammar: Students will practice sentence-combining techniques, avoiding mixed modifiers, proper punctuation and spelling, and writing in parallel structure.
  5. Oral and Visual Communication:  Through class discussion, group exercises, and formal presentations, students will develop public speaking strategies, as well as integrate technology in expressing ideas.
English 11/12: Contemporary Writers & Writing
Course Description: This course will introduce students to first-year college writing programs through the study of literature, through the practice of writing analytical and rhetorical compositions, through the exploration of contemporary forms and themes, and through the development of voice, confidence, and problem solving via creative writing. In addition, English 11/12 will explore writing in the various forms that characterize the digital age. Texts: Title: Seeing and Writing 3 Author: Donald and Christine McQuade, editors Publisher: Bedford St. Martin’s Press Title: Norton Sampler Anthology Author: Thomas Cooley, editor Publisher: Norton Title: Short Fiction Classic and Contemporary, 5th Edition Publisher: Prentice Hall Title: Macbeth Author: William Shakespeare Publisher: Washington Press Units of Study: Unit I
  • Summer Reading
  • The Personal Essay
  • The College Application Essay
  • The Short Story
Unit II
  • Non Fiction and Rhetoric, Selections from:
    • Seeing and Writing 3
    • The Norton Anthology
    • The New York Times
Unit III: Poetry Unit IV: Drama: Macbeth, by William Shakespeare Unit IV: Literature and Film
English 11/12: British Literature
Course Description: The British Literature curriculum is designed to offer students a historical overview of British Literature selections in a variety of genres.  Drama, poetry, short stories, novels, and plays will be read and analyzed.  Literature will be studied chronologically, with a background study of the time period and how it affected the writing.  The composition component of this course emphasizes structure and effective language and includes a variety of creative and expository writing experiences, including research.  Students will have the opportunity to develop their own voice through a variety of genres. Texts: Title: Beowulf Translator: Burton Raffel Publisher: Penguin Books Title: The Canterbury Tales Author: Geoffrey Chaucer Publisher: Bantam Books, 2006 Title: A Midsummer Night’s Dream Author: William Shakespeare Publisher: Hutchinson & Company, 1984 Title: Gulliver’s Travels Author: Jonathan Swift Publisher: Penguin Books, 1999 Title: The Importance of Being Earnest Author: Oscar Wilde Publisher: Penguin Books, 1985 Title: Much Ado About Nothing Author: William Shakespeare Publisher: Washington Square Press, 1995 Title: Dracula Author: Bram Stoker Publisher: Penguin Books, 1995 Title: Dr. Jekyll & Mr. Hyde Author: Robert Louis Stevenson Publisher: Bantam Books, 2004 Title: The Jungle Book Author: Rudyard Kipling Publisher: Penguin Books, 1981 Title: Silas Marner Author: George Eliot Publisher: Penguin Books. 1981 Units of Study:
  1. Anglo-Saxon Literature
  2. Middle Ages
  3. Rennaissance
  4. 17th Century
  5. Rationalism
  6. Restoration
  7. Romanticism
  8. Victorian Age
  9. Modern & Contemporary
Advanced Placement English Literature & Composition
Course Description: Designed to be a college level course, rich in higher level thinking, AP English Literature & Composition will challenge, inspire, and enrich the eager literature student. Students will read works that range from the 16th through 21st century in a variety genres, grouped thematically. The reading, writing, listening, and speaking experiences will broaden human understandings about the world around us.  There will be a focus on literary devices and skills for the AP Exam, and practice portions of the test will be given on a weekly basis.  Students should expect a rigorous undergraduate English experience with intellectual challenges and a considerable workload that culminates with the AP Literature & Composition Exam in May.  This course is authorized by the Advanced Placement program. Texts: Title: The Poisonwood Bible Author: Barbara Kingsolver Publisher: Harper Perennial Classics, 1998 Title: The Lord of the Flies Author: William Golding Publisher: Perigee Books, 1954 Title: The Merchant of Venice Author: William Shakespeare Publisher: Washington Square Press, 1992 Title: Frankenstein Author: Mary Shelley Publisher: Penguin Books, 1983 Title: Hamlet Author: William Shakespeare Publisher: Washington Square Press, 1992 Title: The Turn of the Screw Author: Henry James Publisher: Tom Doherty Associates, 1993 Title: The Haunting of Hill House Author: Shirley Jackson Publisher: Penguin Books, 2006 Title: Rosencrantz & Guildenstern Are Dead Author: Tom Stoppard Publisher: Grove Press, 1967 Title: Beloved Author: Toni Morrison Publisher: Penguin Books, 1988 Title: Brave New World Author: Aldous Huxley Publisher: Harper Collins, 1989 Title: The Scarlet Letter Author: Nathaniel Hawthorne Publisher: Bantam Books, 2003 Units of Study:
  1. Survival & Oppression
  2. Isolation & Depression
  3. Uncertainty & Madness
  4. Choice & Freedom
Advanced Placement English Language & Composition
Students in AP English Language and Composition will read carefully a wide variety of non-fiction and fiction selections, analyzing form, purpose, and audience, in order to gain a deeper understanding of how language works.  Students will apply in their own writing their knowledge of craft and technique, composing essays in a variety of modes, including the expository, the analytical, the personal, and the argumentative. In addition, students will fulfill the weekly Writer's Notebook, a year-long series of creative prompts in order to utilize form and context, and to increase student confidence with the written word.  We will also intensively examine the themes and forms of the AP Composition Test as an introduction to strategies for analysis, argumentation, and artistry of the written word.   This course is authorized by the Advanced Placement program. Sample Texts: Title: Seeing and Writing 3 Editor: McQuade and McQuade Publisher: Bedford St. Martins Title: The Norton Sampler of the Essay Editor: Cooley Publisher: Norton Title: MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers Author: Joseph Gibaldi Publisher: Modern Language Association of America Title: This Boy's Life Author: Tobias Wolff Publisher: Atlantic Press Title: High Tide in Tucson Author: Barbara Kingsolver Publisher: Harper Perennial Units of Study:
  1. First Quarter: Memoir and the Autobiographical Persona
  2. Second Quarter:  Description and Analysis
  3. Third Quarter:  Synthesis, Argumentation, and Food
  4. Fourth Quarter:  Making Connections and the Exam
Effective Communication
Course Description: In this course, students will learn that communication is the process that links every individual with the self, the environment, and other people.  Students will become better communicators by identifying strengths and weaknesses and by organizing their thoughts and writing in preparation for speechmaking.  Students will deliver various types of speeches and will learn to adapt their communication to fit different audiences and purposes.  Through the study of oral communication, students will be better able to assess the language that surrounds them and its impact on their lives. Texts: A variety of famous speeches will be analyzed, as well as video clips of speeches in films Units of Study:
  1. Organizing a speech
  2. Strong & Memorable Introductions and Conclusions
  3. Effective Techniques  (body language, eye contact, posture, etc.)
  4. Effective Use of Visual Aids
  5. Voice (pitch, rate, diction, etc.)
  6. Memorable Word Structures  (literary devices, etc.)
  7. Reasoning and Logical Fallacies
  8. Informative, Demonstrative, and Persuasive Speeches
  9. Debates
  10. Drama
  11. Résumés and Cover Letters

Foreign Language

Hebrew 7/8
Seventh and eighth-grade students are combined and then divided into separate classes based on Hebrew language skills.  At the end of this course, students will feel more comfortable initiating a conversation in Hebrew about familiar topics and will be able to compose a proper paragraph, using the vocabulary and sentence structures learned in class.  


Main Textbooks:

Title: Ivrit MIbereshit Aleph (New Addition)
Author: Nili Ganani & Ruthi Shimoni
Publisher: David Rachgold Inc.

Title: Ivrit MIbereshit Bet (New Addition)
Author: Nili Ganani & Ruthi Shimoni
Publisher: David Rachgold Inc.

Title: Bereshit and Yanshuf (current events newspaper for Hebrew Language students)
Publisher: Hebrew Today

In addition, many additional resources from books, educational websites, technology activities etc. are used by our teachers to supplement and enhance the material taught in class.

Units of Study:

  • Oral Expression: Composing, answering or initiating conversation about everyday topics (family, food, hobbies, weather…)
  • Reading and presenting news articles to the class
  • Written Expression and Syntax
    • Restating a question and answering in a full sentence
    • Composing simple verb sentences
    • Composing questions, nominal clauses, and complex sentences with dependent clauses
  • Reading Comprehension, and translation
    • Reading a news article from the “Yanshuf” and “Bereshit” newspapers, using a small provided vocabulary key, and understanding the article independently
  • Grammatical concepts appropriate for each skill level relating to agreement of verbs, nouns, genders, Binyanim, and tenses such as:
      • Conjugation of verbs in Binyan Paal in different tenses
      • Understanding gender, pronoun and nouns’ agreement with verbs and adjectives
      • Using correct phrases in present, past and/or future tense
      • Understanding the grammatical rules and composing sentences in the Shem HaPoal- the Infinitive form of the Verb
Hebrew 9/10
Ninth and tenth grade students are combined and then divided into classes based on Hebrew language ability. At the end of this course, students will feel comfortable initiating a conversation in Hebrew about familiar topics, and about general topics. Students will be able to compose a three paragraphs essay, using the vocabulary and sentence structures learned in class, and will be able to write a letter and compose interview questions about a given topic in Hebrew. Incoming CTA students who have little or no background in Hebrew are provided individualized attention to help them at their level.


Main Textbooks:

Title: Ivrit Min HaHatchala Aleph (New Addition)
Author: Shulamit Chayat, Sarah Israeli, Hilah Kobliner
Publisher: Akademon, The Hebrew University in Jerusalem

Title: Ivrit Min HaHatchala Bet (New Addition)
Author: Shulamit Chayat, Sarah Israeli, Hilah Kobliner
Publisher: Akademon, The Hebrew University in Jerusalem

Title: Preparation for SAT Subject Test in Mordern Hebrew
Author: Noga Ganel, Nela (Nilit) Har-Noy
Publisher: Shorashim Carmel Publishing Inc.

Title: Kesharim a textbook for advanced learners of Hebrew
Author: Avital Feuer, Tal Norman, Shirly, Malichi, Rina Kreitman, Michal Cohen
Publisher: University Press of Maryland
Title: Bereshit and Yanshuf (current events newspaper for Hebrew Language students)
Publisher: Hebrew Today

In addition, many additional resources from books, educational websites, technology activities etc. are used by our teachers to supplement and enhance the material taught in class.

  • Oral Expression and conversation such as:
    • Initiating a conversation about everyday topics
    • Conducting an interview in Hebrew
    • Creating a “Remembering2gether” project, reading writing and presenting orally
    • Presenting a project short topic in Hebrew
  • Reading Comprehension, and translation:
    • Short stories, dialogues, and texts.
    • Translation of texts and video from English to Hebrew
    • Reading and understanding Hebrew news articles and understanding them independently
  • Written Expression and Syntax
    • Applying previously learned sentence structures
    • Conjugation and use of the Piel verb form in sentences, in all tenses.
  • Grammatical concepts appropriate for each skill level relating to agreement of verbs, nouns, genders, Binyanim, and tenses such as:
      • Reviewing the Paal verb form and infinitives in all tenses
      • Studying and conjugation the Binyanim Hif-il and Nif’al in sentences
      • Using and conjugating the Piel verb form accurately in all tenses.
Hebrew 11/12
Eleventh and Twelfth-grade students are combined and then divided into classes based on Hebrew language skills and background. Students will feel comfortable understanding and initiating a conversation in Hebrew about familiar everyday and general topics and particularly engaging in small talk and functional conversations in Hebrew. Students will be able to compose essays, letters, or other written work using the vocabulary and sentence structures learned in class comfortably. At the end of this course, students will be more at ease for trips, a semester or a year living in Israel. Incoming CTA students who have little or no background in Hebrew are provided individualized attention to help them at their level.

Main Textbooks:
Title: Ivrit Shlav Aleph and Bet (New Addition)
Author: Ora Band
Publisher: Behrman House, Inc.

Title: Ivrit Min HaHatchala Bet (New Addition)
Author: Shulamit Chayat, Sarah Israeli, Hilah Kobliner
Publisher: Akademon, The Hebrew University in Jerusalem

Title: Preparation for SAT Subject Test in Mordern Hebrew
Author: Noga Ganel, Nela (Nilit) Har-Noy
Publisher: Shorashim Carmel Publishing Inc.

Title: Kesharim a textbook for advanced learners of Hebrew
Author: Avital Feuer, Tal Norman, Shirly, Malichi, Rina Kreitman, Michal Cohen
Publisher: University Press of Maryland
Title: Brandeis Modern Hebrew
Author: Vardit Ringvald
Publisher: Brandeis University Press, 2005
Title: Yanshuf (current events newspaper for Hebrew Language stdeunts)
Publisher: Hebrew Today

In addition, many additional resources from books, educational websites, technology activities etc. are used by our teachers to supplement and enhance the material taught in class.

Units of Study:

  • Oral Expression
    • Improving fluency in common daily conversation
    • Initiating functional conversations in Hebrew (grocery store, bank, movie theater, Cafe…)
    • Speaking about current events in Hebrew
    • Presenting a project in accurate Hebrew
  • Written Expression and Syntax
    • Fluently applying previously learned sentence structures
    • Using Hif’ill verb form verbs in sentences, in all tenses, including nominal clause sentences, and infinitives of the Hif’il verb form
  • Reading/Listening Comprehension
  • Reading a news article from the “Yanshuf” newspaper, and understanding it independently, using only the vocabulary key which accompanies the article
  • Listening or viewing Israeli reports or news and understanding at least the main ideas
  • Grammatical concepts appropriate for each skill level relating to agreement of verbs, nouns, genders, Binyanim, and tenses such as:
  • Reviewing and reinforcing Paal, Nifal, and Pi’el verb form and infinitives in all forms and in complex sentences
  • Studying the Hif’il verb form and Hit’pae’l verb form.
Hebrew For Native Speakers
Upper School students whose primary spoken language at home is Hebrew are often at a level too high for the standard Hebrew classes. For these students, we have been offering an online course from an organization called “Bonim B’Yachad”. The classes are good and can help Hebrew native speakers to move one level up but their down fault is that they cost a lot of money and lack a personal touch. In both 2013-14 and 2014-15, we have offered online courses through Bonim b’Yachad. They have provided Israeli teachers who can tailor the course to the students’ needs. Bagrut preparation was also possible when necessary. However, starting 2016-2017, the idea is to import professional Hebrew speaking teachers, who will assume the responsibility of the Native speakers and provide them with necessary tools to achieve their goals. The goals will be:
  1. To maintain a level of Hebrew that is equivalent to the grade level in Israel.
  2. To reinforce some of the grammatical patterns into the language.
  3. To create a self learner in the Hebrew language field.
  4. To explore Hebrew sights and be able to feel comfortable reading them.
  5. To be able to write a project in high level Hebrew.
  6. To be able to write and express ideas in a college level Hebrew(for 11th12th grade students)
  7. To read fluently an Israeli Newspaper. (without a word bank)
  8. Last but not least, to be able to express ideas in Fluent Hebrew conversation.
Introduction to Spanish
The main goals of this course are to build a beginner’s vocabulary in Spanish and to practice speaking, listening, reading, and writing to achieve basic communication.  Students will also work on basic grammar.  Guest speakers, vocabulary games, and video clips will also play a part in expanding students’ experiences with Spanish.Textbook:Title: Practice Makes Perfect: Basic Spanish Author: Dorothy Richmond Publisher: McGraw Hill, 2009 Units of Study: Unit 1:
  1. Greetings
  2. Alphabet
  3. Calendar
  4. House
  5. Family
  6. Classroom
  7. Clothing
  8. Food
  9. Adjectives
  10. Regular Verbs
  Unit 2:
  1. Questions
  2. Jobs
  3. Furniture
  4. Locations
  5. Moods
  6. Weather
  7. Age
  8. Possessives
  9. Irregular Verbs
  Unit 3:
  1. Time
  2. Sports
  3. Adverbs
  4. Comparisons
  5. Prepositions
  6. Direct Objects
  7. Measurements
  8. Transportation
  9. Other irregular verbs
  Unit 4:
  1. Emotions
  2. Body
  3. Opposites
  4. Future tense
  5. Reflexive verbs
  6. Present Progressive tense

Judaic Studies

7/8 Chumash
This two year, text based course covers the selected passages in the books of Bamidbar and D’varim (Numbers and Deuteronomy) in their original, Hebrew text. The dual foci of this course are text and storyline.  Students master the ability to read, punctuate, translate and explain biblical verses and move from beginner to intermediate level in their ability to decipher the classic Hebrew commentary, Rashi. Moderate exposure to other commentaries (i.e. Ramban and Ohr HaChaim) over the course prepares students for high school Chumash courses. Emphasis is placed on mastering common biblical words and terms.    The storyline in Bamidbar covers traveling through the desert the episodes of The Spies and Korach. In D’varim storyline includes the 10 Commandments, the 1st 2 paragraphs of Shema, False Prophets, Evil Enticers, the Wayward Son, the Wayward City, and the Bible’s approach to war. Texts: Title: The Books of Bamidbar and D’Varim (Hebrew) Editor: Feldheim   Units of Study: Bamidbar/Numbers: Parshat Shelach and Korach
  1. SHLACH (Chapters 13-14)
  • Intro to Chumash
  • History of the Jews
  • The Tribes
  • The encampment in the Desert
  • Spies sent to Israel
  • The “false” report
  • Plague and Punishment – the 40 year decree
  • Moses intercedes
  • Wondering the desert
  1. KORACH (Chapters 15-16)
  • Genealogy
  • Who was Korach
  • Korach’s Rebellion
  • Datan & Abiram and On
  • G-d responds; the Mouth of the Earth
  • Revolution?
  • Plague
  • The Almonds Staff Litmus Test/Aharon is the chosen one
  • Miriam’s death and the lack of water
  • Moshe and Aharon: the “sin of all sins”
7/8 Gemara
This 2 year, text based course follows our 6 year Talmud Tractate rotation (all classes in the Upper School learn the same text but on different levels of complexity). The rotation includes chapters from the following Tractates; Berachot (2 years), Sukka, Pesachim, Kiddushin, and Bava Metzia. Students study the Talmud from its original Aramaic text. The primary foci of this course are textual and conceptual. Textual skills include understanding the layout of the Tractate and page of Talmud, accumulating an understanding of the common phrases used to punctuate the Talmud, key phrases and beginner to intermediate level of reading comprehension. Analytical and processing skills are emphasized as well. Concepts include understanding the Talmudic process in general as well as the particular concepts, questions, answers and outcomes of each discourse. Beginner level Rashi reading and comprehension are achieved as well. Texts: Title: Tractates Berachot, Sukka, Pesachim, Kiddushin, and Bava Metzia Editor: Vilna   Units of Study: All Gemara classes in the Upper School follow the same 6 year cycle of tractates but differ in depth and breadth of study. Tractate Berachot
  1. Ideal times for each prayer
  2. How to make-up a missed prayer
  3. Prayer correlating with our Forefathers and/or sacrifices
  4. What does “until” mean?
  5. Ideal time for nighttime prayers
  6. Walking in front of someone praying
  7. Praying in proximity to one’s rabbi
  8. If one delays the prayer of musaf
  9. The story of Rabbi Gamliel being deposed from office
  10. Eating before prayer
  11. Prayer said upon entering and leaving a house of study
  12. How to bow
Tractate Pesachim
  1. Eating on the eve of Passover
  2. Meals that extend from a holiday to the Sabbath
  3. Saying Kiddush in the place one dines
  4. Changing locations during a meal
  5. Kiddush of Sabbath day
  6. Havdala
Kiddushin
  1. Differences in gender pertaining to
    1. Circumcision
    2. Redemption
    3. Torah study
    4. Marriage
  2. The extent of a one’s obligation of learning, teaching and studying Torah
  3. Honoring one’s parents
  4. Dama son of Nitina
  5. Revering one’s parents
7/8 Navi
This 1 year, text based course on the Prophets covers Shmuel Bet (Samuel II) from its original, Hebrew text. It is divided into 1 semester in 7th grade and 1 semester in 8th grade. The dual foci of this course are text and storyline.  Students master the ability to read, punctuate, translate and explain the verses from Prophets and move from beginner to intermediate level in their ability to decipher classic commentary (Rashi & Metzudat David). The storyline covers the leadership of Samuel, Saul and David and the events therein. Texts: Title: The Book of Samuel (Hebrew) Editor: Shai Lamorah   Units of Study: Shmuel Alef (25-31) and Shmuel Bet (Samuel)
  1. Shmuel’s Death
  2. Naval and his wife Avigail
  3. Avigail marries David
  4. David has the chance to kill Shaul and he does not.
  5. David is fighting against the Plishtim
  6. Shaul goes to a sorceress even though he banned them from the land.
  7. Ziklag was destroyed by the Amalekim, Davids family was captured.
  8. Shaul’s death story #1
  9. Chessed Shel Emet
  10. Shaul’s death story #2
  11. Eish Boshet’s king ship
  12. Asael Dies
  13. War between the house of Shaul and the house of David
  14. Michal and Plitiel
  15. Avner and David make a treaty together
  16. The kingship in the house of Shaul: Eish Boshet killed and Mephiboshet lame
  17. David’s Kingship
7/8 Jewish History
This two year, text based course covers selected points in Jewish history from the 1st commonwealth (Beit HaMikdash) era through the end of the 2nd commonwealth era. The dual foci of this course are text and storyline. Students master the ability to understand, translate, and reference historical passages from the Talmud and Prophets. The goal of the class is to gain an understanding of our rich heritage and sages while focusing on how to apply the lessons of our past to better our future. Texts: Title: History of the Jewish People, Artscroll Publications Author: Rabbis Nosson Scherman and Meir Zlotowitz   Units of Study: Units of Study
  • The End of the First Temple Era
  • The Babylonian Exile
  • Zerubavel and the Building of the Second Temple
  • Ezra and Nechemia
  • The Men of the Great Assembly
  • The Rise of Greece
  • Alexander the Great
  • Hellenism
  • The Hasmonean Era and Chanukah
  • Domination of the Sadducees
  • Ascendency of Rome
  • Roman Dominion over Israel
  • Herod
  • Torah Sages
  • War Against Rome
  • Destruction of the 2nd Temple
  • Hope for the Future
High School Chumash
All High School Chumash classes are divided based on gender and skill/ability. The High School curriculum follows 4 year rotation; Bereishit 1 (Lech-Lecha, Vayeira & Chayai-Sara), Bereishit 2 (Vayeshev, Mikeitz, Vayigash & Vayichi), Shemot (Shemot, Va’Aira & Bo) and Bamidbar (Korach, Chukat & Balak). All students have Chumash every year of high school. Level 1 Entry level High School Chumash classes continue developing independent Chumash learning skills. Students study the Chumash and its commentary in the original Hebrew text. The skill focus of this course includes mastering Rashi reading and comprehension and developing intermediate skills in other classic Hebrew commentaries (e.g. Ramban, Ohr HaChaim, S’porno and Gur Aryeh). The storyline and philosophical implications are emphasized. This course also focuses on analytical skills including critical thinking and informed debate.   Level 2 Advanced level High School Chumash classes move the students into primarily independent Chumash study with commentary. The skill focus of this course includes developing proficiency in the classic commentary beyond Rashi (e.g. Ramban, Ohr HaChaim, S’porno and Gur Aryeh). The storyline and philosophical implications are emphasized. This course also continues to hone analytical skills including critical thinking and informed debate. Texts: Title: Chumash (Hebrew) Editor: Mikraot Gedolot   Units of Study:
  1. Berieshit (Genesis) 1
  1. Avraham begins his odyssey
  2. The debacle in Egypt
  3. Avraham and Lot part ways
  4. War of the 4 kings vs. 5 kings
  5. The Covenant of Parts and the Doctrine of Patriarchal Foreshadowing
  6. New names and a new destiny
  7. Covenant of Circumcision
  8. Avraham and the 3 angels
  9. Avraham intercedes for Sodom
  10. Lot’s fiasco in Sodom and its demise
  11. Rerun in Gerar
  12. Yitzchak is born
  13. YIshmael is banished
  14. The Akeida
  1. Berieshit (Genisis) 2
  1. Dynamics of the 12 tribes and Yaakov
  2. The sale of Yosef
  3. Yehuda’s and Tamar
  4. Yosef and the wife of Potifar
  5. Yosef, the butler, baker and dreams
  6. Yosef interprets Pharaoh’s dreams
  7. Events leading to Yosef and the brothers meeting again
  8. The brother’s struggle with a disguised Yosef
  9. The family reunites
  10. Yaakov’s blessings
  11. The brother’s apologize
  12. Did Yaakov ever find out the truth?
  1. Shemot (Exodus)
  1. The Egyptian Enslavement
  2. Moshe’s birth and childhood
  3. The burning bush
  4. Moshe & Aharon confront Pharaoh
  5. Overview: The structure of the 10 Plagues
  6. The 1st 5 Plagues
  7. The 2nd 5 Plagues
  8. Exodus
  1. Bamidbar (Numbers)
  1. Korach’s Rebellion
  2. Datan & Abiram
  3. G-d responds; the Mouth of the Earth
  4. Protest and Confirmation
  5. A new proof that Aharon is distinguished
  6. The Red Heifer
  7. Miriam’s death and the lack of water
  8. Moshe and Aharon’s enigmatic sin
  9. Bilaam is beckoned
  10. G-d’s ambiguous permission
  11. Bilaam, the angel and the talking Donkey
  12. The blessings of Bilaam
  13. Evaluating Bilaam’s character
High School Gemara
High School  Gemara 1 & 2  is divided based on level rather than grade. Boys and girls have separate classes. (After ninth grade, girls have the option to enroll in an Advanced Navi class instead of Gemara.)   Gemara classes follow  our 6 year Talmud Tractate rotation (all classes in the Upper School learn the same text but with different levels of complexity). The rotation includes chapters from the following Tractates; Berachot (2 years), Sukka, Pesachim, Kiddushin, and Bava Metzia. Students study the Talmud from its original Aramaic text. The primary foci of this course are textual and conceptual. Textual skills for entry level High School Gemara include a familiarity with 30-40 common Talmud punctuation phrases, 100-120 common Talmudic terms and intermediate level reading and comprehension. In addition to mastering the particular concepts, questions, answers and outcomes of each discourse, students will begin to focus on the Halachic (Jewish Law) implications of each discourse. Intermediate-advanced level Rashi reading and comprehension are achieved as well as beginner-intermediate level Tosafot prowess. In this level, students are introduced to several new commentaries including Rosh, Ritva and Rambam.   Level 2 This advanced level Talmud course is designed to enable students to read and comprehend the Talmud independently. In order to achieve this level of independence, students must master the reading and comprehension skills in both Talmud and Rashi. Moderate support in Tosafot as well as other commentary is expected even on this level. Texts: Title: Tractates Berachot, Sukka, Pesachim, Kiddushin, And Bava Metzia Editor: Vilna   Units of Study: All Gemara classes in the Upper School follow the same 6 year cycle of tractates but differ in depth and breadth of study. Tractate Berachot
  1. Ideal times for each prayer
  2. How to make-up a missed prayer
  3. Prayer correlating with our Forefathers and/or sacrifices
  4. What does “until” mean?
  5. Ideal time for nighttime prayers
  6. Walking in front of someone praying
  7. Praying in proximity to one’s rabbi
  8. If one delays the prayer of musaf
  9. The story of Rabbi Gamliel being deposed from office
  10. Eating before prayer
  11. Prayer said upon entering and leaving a house of study
  12. How to bow
Tractate Pesachim
  1. Eating on the eve of Passover
  2. Meals that extend from a holiday to the Sabbath
  3. Saying Kiddush in the place one dines
  4. Changing locations during a meal
  5. Kiddush of Sabbath day
  6. Havdala
Kiddushin
  1. Differences in gender pertaining to
    1. Circumcision
    2. Redemption
    3. Torah study
    4. Marriage
  2. The extent of a one’s obligation of learning, teaching and studying Torah
  3. Honoring one’s parents
  4. Dama son of Nitina
  5. Revering one’s parents
9th Grade Navi
This intermediate level Navi course covers the events and characters from the end of David’s rule through the Beginning of the First Commonwealth. Students study the Navi in its original Hebrew text. Topics include; Shlomo (Solomon), the First Temple, the divide of the Jewish People, Eliyahu (Elijah) versus Achav (Ahab) and the battle against idolatry. The dual foci of this course are textual and storyline. Students develop textual mastery through independent and paired study. Cumulative lists of kings, prophets, important characters and key phrases are kept throughout the year. Texts: Title: Melachim (Hebrew) Editor: Shai Lamorah   Units of Study:
  1. David’s final moments
  2. Shlomo is Chosen
  3. Shlomo ensures justice; David’s retribution
  4. Shlomo’s dream
  5. The Golden Age
  6. Shlomo builds the Beit HaMikdash
  7. Shlomo’s downfall
  8. Rechavan, Yeravam and the splitting of the Nation
  9. Yeravam the tragic failure
  10. Baasha King of Yisroel
  11. Asa King of Yehuda
  12. Assinations, turmoil and spiritual oblivion in Yisroel
  13. Eliyahu vs. Achav and the window of hope
  14. Eliyahu’s epic ascent to Heaven
High School Advanced Navi
This advanced course in Prophets is offered to H.S. girls in grades 10-12 as an alternative to Gemara. Students study the Navi in its original Hebrew text. The passage picks-up from where the 9th grade Navi course leaves off; the beginning of Melachim Bet (Kings II). The dual foci of this course are mastering reading and comprehension skills of verses and a variety of commentary. The storyline covers the end of Eliyahu (Elijah) to the destruction of the First Temple. This advanced level course emphasizes cross-reference analysis between Melachim and parallel coverage of the same events in other books of the Canon (e.g. Chronicles). Texts: Title: Melachim (Hebrew) Editor: Mikraot Gedolot   Units of Study: Kings II
  1. Eliyahu and Elisha - types of leadership, relationship of rabbi and student
  2. Miracles of Eliyahu and Elisha
    1. Purpose of miracles
    2. Navi as a conduit
    3. Fulfillment of G-d’s decrees through the Navi
  3. How the Navi educates his students
  4. How the Navi educates the nation
  5. How the Navi educates other nations
  6. Relationship of Jewish People and other nations
  7. Painful paths of education: War, famine, personal troubles
  8. Kingdom of Yisrael
    1. Its purpose
    2. Its mandate
    3. Its pattern
    4. Potential and missed opportunities
  9. The exactitude of G-d’s judgments
  10. Kingdom of the House of David
    1. Its high and low points
    2. Its immortality
    3. The  scale by which it is judged
    4. Its charge
  11. Individual kings and their strengths, challenges, failures and legacies
  12. The role of the Holy Temple as a fundamental component of national life
  13. Exile of the Ten Tribes
    1. Why/how it happened
    2. The implications/consequences
  14. Chizkiyahu and Sancheriv: The magnitude of the potential and mistakes
  15. Yoshiyau: Potential and impact of the loss
  16. Destruction of the First Temple
    1. History
    2. Related fast days
    3. G-d’s mercy judgment
    4. Understanding the loss – what we mourn
10th Grade Jewish History
This 1 year course on Twentieth Century Jewish History focuses on the movements and events that contribute the experience of the Jewish people in the 1900’s. Topics include the Enlightenment, WW1, WW2 and the Holocaust, Zionism and the State of Israel. Texts: Title: The Jewish World in the Modern Age Author: Jon Bloomberg   Units of Study:
  1. Eastern Europe (1780-2000)
  • Introduction
  • Community in Eastern Europe
  • Life under the Czars
  • The Pale of Settlement
  • The May Laws
  • Russian Revolution
  • The Bolsheviks
  • Joseph Stalin
  • The Refuseniks
  • Gorbachev and the Fall of Communism
  • Russia Today (Vladimir Putin
  1. Western and Central Europe
  • French Revolution
  • Jews on the eve of the Revolution
  • Emancipation of French Jews
  • Reign of Terror (Jacobins and Robespierre)
  • Assembly of Jewish Notables
  • Napoleon Bonaparte
  • The Great Sanhedrin
  • Congress of Vienna
  • Germany and the Habsburg Empire
  • Metternich
  • 1848 – Revolutions
  • Jewish Emancipation
  1. England – Asheknazi Judaism
11th Grade Halacha/Jewish Living
This one year course focuses on contemporary Halacha (Jewish Law). Topics include the Sabbath, the Laws of Blessings and Laws of Daily Conduct (depending on the year). A framework of the laws based on the Talmud studied followed by an exploration of contemporary applications based on various Responsa. Texts: Although there is no base text for this course, Kitzur Shulchan Aruch by Rabbi Shlomo Ganzfried is often referenced   Units of Study: Berachot (Blessings)
  • What is the definition of a blessing
  • What are the fundamental lesson that we learn from blessings
  • The power of gratitude
  • Basic Berachot rules
  • The laws of main foods and secondary foods
  • The definition of “pos Habo bekisnin
  • Brocha procedures
  • Berachot on foods
  Prayer
  • Why is it important to pray
  • Translation and explanation of morning blessings
  • Rules and concepts related to Pesuke Dezimra
  • 1st paragraph of Shema Yisroel
  • 2nd paragraph of Shema Yisroel
  • Translation and explanation of the Amida
  Various Commandments
  • Mezuzah
Kashrut
Jewish Philosophy
Jewish Philosophy is a one semester 12th grade course. Basic tenets of the Judaism including Maimonides’s 13 Principles of Faith are explored based on text, discussion and critical thinking and writing. Texts: Title: The Ways of G-d Author: Rav Moshe Chaim Luzzato   Jewish Philosophy Units of Study: Derech Hashem The Purpose in Creation
  1. The bestowal of good
  2. Earning this good
  3. G-d as the ultimate good
  4. Good and evil
  5. Man
Man
  1. Free will
  2. Body and soul
  3. Effort and reward
  4. The world to come
  5. Original sin
  6. Before the sin
  7. The soul’s power
  8. The results of Adam’s sin
  9. Death and the world’s destruction
  10. The different levels of reward
  11. The world of souls
  12. Experiences of the disembodied soul
  13. Resurrection
Israel Advocacy
Students explore history and current events in order to understand their impact on the State of Israel and the Jewish People. An emphasis is placed on application and compelling articulation of their research based conclusions. Text: The David Project Editor: Multimedia Curriculum   Israel Advocacy Units of Study:
  1. The importance of studying Israel advocacy
  2. The regional map of the Middle East
  3. The regional dynamics of the Arab-Israeli conflict
  4. How other Middle Eastern states were established
  5. Jewish connection to the land of Israel
  6. Jewish development of the land
  7. The origins of the Palestinian refugee problem
  8. The origins of the Jewish refugee problem
  9. Major events leading to the 6th day war
  10. The Nature of the UN’s criticism of Israel

Mathematics

7th Grade Math
This course is a first year, Pre-Algebra-level course designed to help students begin  a 2-year transition toward Algebra 1.  One of the main purposes of the course is to assure that students have a solid foundation with all elementary topics in general math, especially ones most important for elementary algebra and geometry.  The course covers, among other topics, Ratios and Proportions, the Real Number System, and introduction to Elementary Probability and Statistics.  Incorporated within these topics are operations on integers, fractions, decimals, and percents.  Close attention to the new state standards for mathematics will be paramount for the course, and all of the lessons and student work are in accord with Common Core Math practices. Text: Title: Go Math (Grade 7) Authors: Larson, Kanold, et al. Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2014 Units of Study:
  • Integers
  • Rational Numbers
  • Proportions
  • Expressions and Equations
  • Inequalities
  • Elementary Geometry
  • Data Analysis
  • Probability
8th Grade Math
This course was introduced to CTA in 2013-14 for the purpose of more readily accommodating the new state standards.  It is meant as an important second course in Pre-Algebra mathematics that will afford the students a more knowledgeable and thus smoother transition into Algebra.  The topics covered, while somewhat similar to those of Math 7, indeed are explored and worked with on a broader and more in-depth level.  Familiar topics such as those worked with in the Number System, those related to Expressions and Equations, and ones covered in basic Geometry are dealt with on a more abstract level.  Alternate strategies are used to analyze topics both qualitatively and quantitatively.  All of the lessons and student work are in accord with Common Core Math practices. Text: Title: Go Math (Grade 8) Authors: Larson, Kanold,  et al. Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2014 Units of Study:
  • Real Numbers
  • Exponents
  • Proportional / Non-proportional Relationships
  • Linear Equations
  • Functions
  • Systems of Equations
  • Transformations with Congruence / Similarity
  • Angle Relationships
  • Triangles
  • Pythagorean
  • Volume
Algebra I
This course focuses on graphical representations and algebraic methods applied to linear and quadratic equations. Throughout the year emphasis will be placed on maintaining strong arithmetic skills while developing and maintaining fundamental algebraic skills.  Emphasis will also be placed on the application and practice of the Common Core Standards: making sense of problems and persevering in solving them, reasoning abstractly and quantitatively, constructing viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others, modeling with mathematics,   Using appropriate tools strategically, Attending to precision, looking for and making use of structure, and looking for and expressing regularity in repeated reasoning. Text: Title: Algebra 1, Common Core Edition Author: Carter, Cuevas, Day, Malory, Casy, Holiday Publisher: Glenco/McGraw-Hill, Inc. 2014 Units of Study: Unit 1 - Relations between Quantities Unit 2 - Linear Relationships Unit 3 - Exponential and Quadratic Relationships Unit 4 - Advanced Functions and Equations Unit 5 - Data Analysis Topic List:
  • Variables
  • Exponents and Powers
  • Algebraic Expressions
  • Integers
  • Order of Operations
  • Properties of Arithmetic
  • Linear Equations (one Variable)
  • Linear Inequalities (one Variable)
  • Factoring
  • Graphing/ Coordinate Plane
  • Slope
  • Quadratic Functions
  • Radicals/Pythagorean Theorem
  • Exponential Functions
  • Linear Functions (two variables)
  • Ratio, Proportion and Similar Figures
Algebra II
Algebra II is designed to continue a logical development of a second course in algebra.  The primary aims are to help students understand algebra as a study of the structure of real and complex number systems, and, promote the understanding of both linear and non-linear functional forms.  In addition, the course offers a deeper analysis  of  the relationship  between equations, graphs, and tables through the modeling of  real-life  applications and problem-solving.  Moreover, Algebra II includes a second phase of the Trigonometry that is presented in  Geometry, and includes an introduction to the Unit Circle. Text: Title: Algebra 2 (Glencoe) Author: Carter, Day, Cuevas, Malloy Publisher: McGraw-Hill, 2014 Units of Study: Unit 1 - Equations and Inequalities Unit 2 - Linear Relations and Functions Unit 3 - Systems of Equations and Inequalities Unit 4 - Quadratic Functions and Relations Unit 5 - Polynomials and Polynomial Functions Unit 6 - Inverse and Radical Functions and Relations Unit 7 - Exponential and Logarithmic Functions and Relations Unit 8 - Rational Functions and Relations  
Algebra II With Trigonometry
This course provides students an opportunity to expand their understanding of the basic algebraic concepts  of equations, inequalities and graphs. Factored polynomials and quadratic equations that lead to solutions are covered as well radicals,  complex numbers, exponents, logarithms, conic sections, , and trigonometric functions. Students will explore how functions behave using calculators, computer software, online applets and programming languages. Formulas and functions will be coded onto computers using Python, a software programming language, providing students with a practical approach to logical algorithms .   Text: Title: Algebra 2, Common Core Edition Author: Carter, Cuevas, Day, Malory, Casy, Holiday Publisher: Glenco/McGraw-Hill, Inc. 2014 Units of Study: Unit 1: Linear Relations and Functions
  • Equations and Inequalities
  • Linear Relations and Functions
  • Systems of Equations and Inequalities
Unit 2: Quadratic, Polynomial, and Radical Functions and Relations
  • Quadratic Functions and Relations
  • Polynomials and Polynomial Functions
  • Inverses and Radical Functions and Relations
Unit 3: Advanced Functions and Relations
  • Exponential and Logarithmic Functions and Relations
  • Rational Functions and Relations
  • Conic Sections
Unit 4: Discrete Mathematics
  • Sequences and Series
  • Statistics and Probability
Unit 5: Trigonometry
  • Trigonometric Functions
  • Trigonometric Identities and Equations
Algebra III
Algebra III is designed to continue a logical development of a third course in algebra.  For the 1st semester, the primary aims are to help students further develop and hone their algebra skills through review of Algebra I, Algebra II, Trigonometry, and some basic  Geometry as it relates to Algebra.  In the 2nd semester , the students are introduced to more complex concepts related to Advanced Algebra such as  Conic  Sections, Logarithms, Sequences and Series, and Inverse Trigonometric Functions. Textbook: Title: Glencoe Algebra 2 Publisher: McGraw-Hill, 2014 Review Textbook: Title: Algebra 1 Concepts and Skills Publisher: McDougal Littell, 2001 Units of Study: Unit 1 - Equations and Inequalities Unit 2 - Relations and Functions:
  •            Linear, Quadratic, Inverse, Radical, Exponential, Logarithmic, Rational,
  •            Trigonometric Linear Relations and Functions
Unit 3 - Systems of Equations and Inequalities Unit 4 - Polynomials Unit 5 - Conic Sections Unit 6 - Sequence and Series Unit 7 - Probability and Statistics Unit 8 - Further Study in Trigonometry
Geometry
Geometry is the investigation of shape, size, and visual patterns.  The course approaches this investigation with rigorous analysis at an intermediate level while reviewing many of the concepts and mathematical techniques that students have learned from an algebra course.   Basic elements of logic are introduced such as conditional statements, converses, and bi-conditionals (definitions).  The students will learn much of the geometry as it relates to theorems and  postulates.   Learning how to write formal mathematical proofs is introduced for the first time,  and the writing of proofs becomes more challenging as it is stressed throughout the  course.  Working with quadrilaterals, triangles, and circles is of major importance, and elementary trigonometry as related to  right triangles  is presented and explored.  A vital project assigned has students constructing 3-D Polyhedra with compass and straightedge. Textbook: Title: Geometry (Glencoe) Author: Carter, Cuevas, Day, and Malloy Publisher: McGraw-Hill, 2012 Units of Study: Unit 1 - Basic Tools of Geometry Unit 2 - Reasoning and Proof Unit 3 - Parallel and Perpendicular Lines Unit 4 - Triangles Unit 5 - Quadrilaterals Unit 6 - Proportions and Similarity Unit 7 - Right Triangle Trigonometry Unit 8 - Transformations and Symmetry Unit 9 – Circles Unit 10 - Surface Area and Volume
Pre-Calculus
Pre-Calculus is a college-prep course designed to provide a solid background for students preparing to either take A/B or B/C Calculus. Students are exposed to a wide variety of mathematical concepts and their application in problem solving. Concepts covered include the real number system and the basic rules of algebra, exponents, radicals, polynomials, inequalities, functions, relations and are taught and used in a variety of applications. The basics of trigonometry are presented and students gain experience solving real world problems as they may occur in the sciences and other general studies courses. Topics in trigonometry include: the unit circle, angle measures, trigonometric functions, inverse functions, right angle problem solving, and various trigonometric formulas. Other concepts include polar coordinates, the graphing of conic sections, matrices, graphing polynomial, rational, irrational, exponential and logarithmic functions. Textbooks: Title: Precalculus with Limits, Third Edition Authors: Ron Larson Publisher: Brooks/Cole Cengage, 2014 Units of Study:
  1. Functions and Their Graphs
  2. Polynomial and Rational Functions
  3. Exponential and Logarithmic Functions
  4. Trigonometry
  5. Analytic Trigonometry
  6. Additional Topics in Trigonometry
  7. Systems of Equations and Inequalities
  8. Matrices and Determinants
  9. Sequences, Series and Probability
  10. Topics in Analytic Geometry
  11. Analytic Geometry in Three Dimensions
  12. Limits and an Introduction to Calculus
  13. Concepts in Statistics
Advanced Placement Calculus (AB)
This is a rigorous course in introductory single variable calculus, divided into  roughly one semester of differential calculus and one semester of integral calculus.  Students learn standard techniques and apply skills to solving  real-world problems in mathematics, physics, engineering, business, and economics.  The course is taught with the expectation of students succeeding on the national AP Calculus AB Exam in the late spring. This course is authorized by the College Board Advanced Placement program. Text: Title: Calculus (AP Edition/4th Edition) Authors: Finney, Demana, Waits, and Kennedy Publisher: Prentice Hall, 2012 Units of Study: 1  Limits 2  Derivatives and Related Topics: Definition, Properties, Graphical, Numerical, Analytic, Instant Rate of Change, Differentiability,  Tangent Lines, Increasing/Decreasing Functions, Mean Value Theorem, Concavity, Inflection, Extrema, Related Rates, Velocity and Acceleration, Implicitness, Slope Fields, General Rules, Chain Rule 3  Integrals and Related Topics:
  • Definition, Properties, Riemann Sums, Accumulation of a Quantity,
  • Exact and Approximation Methods for Area and Volume, Fundamental
  • Theorem of Calculus, Mean Value Theorem for Integrals,
  • Antidifferentiation, Integration Methods, Initial Value Problems,
  • Separable Differential Equations
 
Advanced Placement Calculus (BC)
This is a rigorous course in introductory single variable calculus, divided into  roughly one semester of differential calculus and one semester of integral calculus.  Students learn standard techniques and apply skills to solving  real-world problems in mathematics, physics, engineering, business, and economics.  The course is taught with the expectation of students succeeding on the national AP Calculus BC Exam in the late spring. This course is authorized by the College Board Advanced Placement program.           Text: Calculus (AP Edition/4th Edition) Authors: Finney, Demana, Waits, and Kennedy Publisher: Prentice Hall, 2012 Units of Study: 1  Limits 2  Derivatives and Related Topics:
Definition, Properties, Graphical, Numerical, Analytic, Instant Rate of Change, Differentiability,  Tangent Lines, Increasing/Decreasing Functions, Mean Value Theorem, Concavity, Inflection, Extrema, Related Rates, Velocity and Acceleration, Implicitness, Slope Fields, General Rules, Chain Rule, Analysis of Planar Curves in Parametric, Polar and Vector Forms,  Euler’s Method, L’Hopital’s Rule, Derivatives of Parametric, Polar, Vector Functions
3  Integrals and Related Topics:
Definition, Properties, Riemann Sums, Accumulation of a Quantity,      Exact and Approximation Methods for Area and Volume, Fundamental    Theorem of Calculus, Mean Value Theorem for Integrals, Antidifferentiation, Integration Methods, Initial Value Problems, Separable and Logistic Differential Equations,  Area Under Polar Curves, Arc Length, Integration by Parts and Partial Fractions,  Improper Integrals, Geometric / Harmonic / Alternating Series,  Tests for Convergence and Divergence of a Series,  Taylor Polynomials and Series, Maclaurin Polynomials and Series, Power Series, Lagrange Error Bound.
Advanced Placement Statistics
This course will introduce students to four major concepts in statistics: the proper planning and collection of data; the recognition of patterns and the significance of these patterns in data; the discovery of random patterns using probability; and the techniques used to analyze and draw conclusions from data. Students will learn how to conduct proper observational and experimental studies by actually designing and conducting studies that are of interest to them.  They will look for patterns in the display of the data they collect and determine the significance of these patterns. Statistical inference in the form of hypotheses testing will be used to explore and test assumptions students made as data was compiled. Graphic calculators will be an integral part of the learning process. As we move through the different aspects of statistics, students will become more adept in the use of their calculator. In addition to the calculator, other tools to plot data will be used throughout the year including Excel, R programming language and online plotting resources. This course is authorized by the College Board Advanced Placement program. Texts: Title: Introduction to Statistics and Data Analysis, Fourth Edition Author: Roxy Peck, Chris Olsen, and Jay Devore Publisher: Brooks/Cole, 2012 Title: Online Excel and Statistics Manual Author: Jack Morse Publisher: Pearson Education, Inc., 2013 URL: http://media.pearsoncmg.com/aw/aw_agresti_as_learning_data_3/tech_manuals/excel/ast3e_excel_manual.html Units of Study: Chapter 1 -The Role of Statistics and the Data Analysis Process (3 days) Chapter 2 -Collecting Data Sensibly (10 days) Chapter 3 - Displaying Univariate Data (total time: 4 days) Chapter 4 - Describing Univariate Data (total time: 8 days) Chapter 5: Describing Bivariate Data (total time: 16 days) Chapter 6: Probability (total time: 13 days) Chapter 7: Random Variables (total time: 18 days) Chapter 8: Sampling Distributions (total time: 9 days) Chapter 9: Confidence Intervals (total time: 10 days) Chapter 10: Hypothesis Tests (total time: 11 days) Chapter 11: Two Sample Procedures (total time: 11 days) Chapter 12: Chi-square Tests (total time: 8 days) Chapter 13: Inference for Slope (total time: 5 days)

Science

Science 7
Seventh grade science is part of a two-year junior high Science curriculum. Students use a variety of classroom and laboratory investigations to develop scientific knowledge, critical thinking and the ability to perform scientific research. The focus of seventh grade science is on Life Science, Physical Science (Chemistry); and Scientific Inquiry, technology and ways of knowing. Combined with the eighth grade curriculum, students will be well prepared high school science . Textbook: Title: Integrated iScience: Leopard (Year Two) Authors: Biggs, Feather, Fisher and Ortleb Publisher: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, 2012 Units of Study Unit 0: The Nature of Science
  1. Scientific explanations
  2. Scientific method
Unit 1: Life: Structure and Function
  1. Classifying and exploring life
  2. Cell structure and function
  3. From a cell to an organism
  4. Reproduction of organisms
Unit 2: Life: Changes and Interactions
  1. Genetics
  2. The environment and change over time
  3. Human body systems
  4. Plant processes and reproduction
  5. Interaction of living things
Unit 3: Matter, Energy, and Motion
  1. Foundations of Chemistry
  2. The periodic table
  3. Using energy and heat
Science 8
Eighth grade science is part of a two-year junior high Science curriculum. Students use a variety of classroom and laboratory investigations to develop scientific knowledge, critical thinking and the ability to perform scientific research.  The focus of eighth grade science is on Physical Science (Chemistry and Physics); and Scientific Inquiry, technology and ways of knowing. Combined with the seventh grade curriculum, students will be well prepared high school science. Textbook: Title: Integrated iScience, Course 3 Editors: Michelle Anderson et al. Publisher: Glenco/McGraw-Hill, 2012 Units of Study Ch. 1 Describing Motion Ch. 2 Newton's Laws of Motion Ch. 3 Energy, Work, & Simple Machines Ch. 4 Sound & Light Ch. 11 & 12 The Solar System - Stars & Galaxies Ch. 13 Minerals & Rocks Ch. 14 & 15 Plate Tectonics - Earthquakes & Volcanoes Ch. 16 Fossils and Age Dating Ch. 17 Geologic Time Ch. 18 Ecosystems Ch. 20 Environmental Impacts
Biology
Biology is a ninth grade course in the high school Science curriculum. Students use a variety of classroom and laboratory exercises to develop scientific knowledge, critical thinking and the ability to perform scientific research.  This course investigates the composition, diversity, complexity and interconnectedness of life on Earth. Fundamental concepts of heredity and evolution provide a framework through inquiry-based instruction to explore the living world, the physical environment and the interactions within and between them. Students engage in laboratory investigations to understand and explain the behavior of living things in a variety of scenarios that incorporate scientific reasoning, analysis, communication skills and real-world applications. Textbook: Title: Modern Biology Authors: John H. Postlethwait & Janet L. Hopson Publisher: Hold, Rinehart, Winston, 2009 Units of Study Ch. 4 Cell Structure & Function Ch. 8 Cell Reproduction Ch. 9 Fundamentals of Genetics Ch. 12/13 Inheritance Patterns and Human Genetics/ Gene Technology Ch. 14/15/16 Theory of Evolution/Population Genetics and Speciation Ch. 23/24 Bacteria & Viruses Ch. 26 Fungi Ch. 27/29 Plants/ Plant Structure and Function Ch. 32/36 Invertebrates Ch. 40 Vertebrates Ch. 45 Human Systems Ch. 18 Ecology
Chemistry
Chemistry is a high school level course taken by tenth graders which satisfies the Ohio Core science graduation requirements. This course introduces students to key concepts and theories that provide a foundation for further study in other sciences as well as advanced science disciplines. Chemistry comprises a systematic study of the predictive physical interactions of matter and subsequent events that occur in the natural world. The study of matter through the exploration of classification, its structure and its interactions is how the course is organized. Laboratory Investigations are used to understanding and explain the behavior of matter in a variety of inquiry and design scenarios that incorporate scientific reasons, analysis, communication skills and real-world applications. An understanding of leading theories and how they have informed current knowledge prepares students with higher order cognitive capabilities of evaluation, prediction and application. Textbook: Title: Chemistry in the Community Authors: Henry Heikkinen Publisher: American Chemical Society, 2011 Title: Chemistry Made Simple Authors: John T. Moore, Ed.D. Publisher: Made Simple Books, 2005 Units of Study
  1. Matter
  2. Periodic Table Organization
  3. Atomic Model
  4. Chemical Bonding/Chemical reactions
  5. Solubility/Saturation
  6. Acids and bases
  7. Gas Laws
  8. Stoichiometry 
Physics
Physics is a high school level course taken in eleventh or twelfth grade which satisfies the Ohio Core science graduation requirement of Ohio. Physics elaborates on the study of the key concepts of motion, forces and energy as they relate to increasingly complex systems and applications that will provide a foundation for further study in science and scientific literacy. Students engage in laboratory investigations to understand and explain motion, forces and energy in a variety of inquiry and design scenarios that incorporate scientific reasoning, analysis, communication skills and real-world application. Textbook: Title: Conceptual Physics Author: Paul G. Hewitt Publisher: Pearson, 2009 Website: Ohio Energy Project URL: http://www.ohioenergy.org/educators/efficiency/aep-ohio Units of Study Ch. 2 Newton's First Law of Motion Ch. 3 Linear Motion Ch. 4 Newton's Second Law of Motion Ch. 5 Newton's Third Law of Motion Ch. 6 Momentum Ch. 7 Energy Ohio Energy Project
Advanced Biology
Biology includes interrelationships of living organisms, levels of biological organization, human biology, social implications, biochemistry, ecology, and genetics. Extensive laboratory work and problem solving are essential components of this class. By the end of this course, the student will be able to:
  1. Explain the steps of the scientific process and demonstrate safe laboratory procedures.
  2. Describe the structure & function of a cell and its organelles.
  3. Explain the processes of photosynthesis & cellular respiration.
  4. Explain the steps of cell division & cell reproduction.
  5. Explain the fundamentals of genetics & inheritance.
  6. Illustrate the process of DNA replication and protein synthesis.
  7. List and describe the major kingdoms of living organisms.
  8. Explain the theory of evolution.
  9. Explain the structure & function of the major body systems in humans.
  Textbook: Title: Modern Biology Authors: Postlethwait and Hopson Publisher: Holt, Rinehart and Wilson, 2006 Units of Study Unit 1 – Foundations of Biology
  1. The Science of Life
  2. Chemistry of Life
  3. Biochemistry
Unit 2 – Cell Biology
  1. Cell Structure and Function
  2. Homeostasis and Cell Transport
  3. Photosynthesis
  4. Cellular Respiration
  5. Cell Reproduction
  Unit 3 – Genetics and Biotechnology
  1. Fundamentals of Genetics
  2. DNA, RNA, and Protein Synthesis
  3. Gene Expression
  4. Inheritance Patterns and Human Genetics
  5. DNA Technology
Unit 4 – Evolution
  1. History of Life
  2. Theory of Evolution
  3. Population Genetics and Speciation
  4. Classification of Organisms
Advanced Chemistry
This is a college preparatory course in which we will study the structure, composition and properties of matter and the chemical changes that matter undergoes. This course is for the student who plans to pursue a college career in a science or math field, or a student who wants to keep that option open. This course is rigorous and students should expect daily homework and outside reading. Learning will take place through lecture, problem solving, laboratory experiences, classroom discussions, demonstrations, text readings, and homework assignments. There will be approximately 14 – 16 laboratory experiences throughout the year. Students who complete Advanced Chemistry will be well prepared for AP Chemistry. Textbook: Title: Chemistry: Matter and Change Authors: Buthelezi, Dingrando, Hainen, Wistrom and Zike Publisher: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, 2008 Units of Study:
  1. The Scientist’s Toolkit
  1. The Scientist’s notebook- The Cornell note-taking system
  2. Laboratory Equipment and Safety
  3. How to think like a scientist
  4. Math skills for Scientists
  5. How to record Data
  6. How to make a data table
  7. Making graphs from data tables
  1. Chapter 2: Data Analysis
  2. Chapter 3: Matter- Properties and Change
  3. Chapter 4: The Structure of the Atom
  4. Chapter 5: Electrons in Motion
  5. Chapter 6: The Periodic Table and Periodic Law
  6. Chapter 7: The Elements
  7. Chapter 8: Ionic Compound
  8. Chapter 9: Covalent Bonding
  9. Chapter 10: Chemical Reactions
  10. Chapter 11: The Mole
  11. Chapter 12: Stoichiometry
  12. Chapter 13: States of Matter
  13. Chapter 14: Gases
  14. Chapter 15: Solutions
  15. Chapter 16: Reaction Rates
  16. Chapter 19: Acids and Bases
AP Physics I: Mechanics - Algebra Based
AP Physics I: Mechanics is equivalent to a one-semester, algebra-based, college-level physics course, especially appropriate for students planning to specialize or major in any scientific field. The course explores topics related to all types of motion and introductory circuits. Algebra and trigonometry are used throughout the course. Textbook: Title: College Physics: A Strategic Approach, 3rd Edition Authors: Knight, Jones & Field Publisher: Pearson, 2014 Units of Study:
  1. Kinematics
    1. 1-D Motion
    2. 2-D Motion
    3. Circular Motion
  1. Forces
    1. Newton’s Laws
    2. Gravitation and Orbits
  1. Rotational Motion
    1. Angular Quantities
    2. Torque
    3. Statics and Dynamic Equilibrium
  1. Rotational Motion
    1. Angular Quantities
    2. Torque
    3. Statics and Dynamic Equilibrium
  1. Momentum & Impulse
    1. Impulse-Momentum Theorem
    2. Conservation of Momentum - Collisions
  1. Energy
    1. Energy
    2. Conservation of Energy
    3. Work & Power
  1. Oscillations & Waves
    1. Simple Harmonic Motion
    2. Properties of Waves
    3. Sound Waves
  1. Electricity
    1. Electrostatics
    2. DC Circuits
Advanced Placement Physics C: Mechanics
AP Physics C: Mechanics is equivalent to a one-semester, calculus-based, college-level physics course, especially appropriate for students planning to specialize or major in physical science or engineering. The course explores topics such as kinematics; Newton’s laws of motion; work, energy and power; systems of particles and linear momentum; circular motion and rotation; and oscillations and gravitation. A thorough knowledge of algebra and basic trigonometry is required for the course.  Understanding of the basic principles involved and the ability to apply these principles in the solution of problems will be the major goal of the course. Consequently, the course will utilize guided inquiry and student-centered learning to foster the development of critical thinking skills. Introductory differential and integral calculus is used throughout the course. The Physics C: Mechanics course will also include approximately 10-12 hands-on laboratory experiments comparable to introductory college-level physics laboratories, with a minimum of five laboratory investigations per quarter. Each student will compile and maintain a lab notebook or portfolio of lab reports that can be used to demonstrate the level of rigor of this AP Physics C course to colleges and universities. This course is authorized by the College Board’s Advanced Placement Program. Textbook: Title: Fundamentals of Physics, 10th ed Authors: Halliday, Resnick and Walker Publisher: Wiley Press, 2014 Units of Study:
    1. Newtonian Mechanics
  1. Kinematics
  1. 1-D motion 1.5 weeks
  2. Vectors 1.0 weeks
  3. 2-D motion 1.5 weeks
  1. Newton’s Laws of Motion 3.0 weeks
  2. Work, Energy, and Power 2.0 weeks
  3. Systems of Particles, Linear Momentum 2.0 weeks
  4. Rotation 2.0 weeks
  5. Angular momentum 2.0 weeks
  6. Oscillations and Gravitation 2.0 weeks
  7. Review 1.0 weeks
Total: 18.0 weeks
Advanced Placement Physics C: Electricity & Magnetism
AP Physics C: Electricity and Magnetism is a one-semester, calculus-based, college-level physics course, especially appropriate for students planning to specialize or major in science or engineering. The course explores topics such as electrostatics; conductors, capacitors, and dielectrics; electric circuits; magnetic fields; and electromagnetism. A thorough knowledge of algebra and basic trigonometry is required for the course.  Understanding of the basic principles involved and the ability to apply these principles in the solution of problems will be the major goal of the course. Consequently, the course will utilize guided inquiry and student-centered learning to foster the development of critical thinking skills. Introductory differential and integral calculus is used throughout the course. The Physics C: Electricity and Magnetism course will also include approximately 10-12 hands-on laboratory experiments comparable to introductory college-level physics laboratories, with a minimum of five laboratory investigations per quarter. Each student will compile and maintain a lab notebook or portfolio of lab reports that can be used to demonstrate the level of rigor of this AP Physics C course to colleges and universities. This course is authorized by the College Board’s Advanced Placement program. Textbook: Title: Fundamentals of Physics, 10th ed Authors: Halliday, Resnick and Walker Publisher: Wiley Press, 2014 Units of Study:
  1. Electricity
  1. Electrostatics 2.0 weeks
  2. Electric Fields 1.5 weeks
  3. Gauss’ Law 1.5 weeks
  4. Capacitance 1.5 weeks
  5. DC Circuits 1.5 weeks
  1. Magnetism
    1. Magnetic Fields 1.5 weeks
    2. Magnetic Fields due to Electric Currents 1.0 weeks
    3. Faraday’s Law of Induction 2.0 weeks
    4. Inductance 1.5 weeks
    5. Maxwell’s Equations 1.0 weeks
    6. Review 1.0 weeks
Total: 16.0 weeks
Advanced Placement Chemistry
AP Chemistry is a full first year college course in general chemistry for majors. This course is rigorous. The AP Chemistry course provides students with a foundation to support future advanced course work in chemistry or other science career. Through inquiry-based learning, students develop critical thinking and reasoning skills. Students cultivate their understanding of chemistry and science practices as they explore advanced chemistry topics. A thorough knowledge of algebra and basic trigonometry is required for the course.  Understanding of the basic principles involved and the ability to apply these principles in the solution of problems will be the major goal of the course. Consequently, the course will utilize guided inquiry and student-centered learning to foster the development of critical thinking skills. AP Chemistry covers each of the following content areas: States of Matter, Structure of Matter, Reactions, intermolecular forces and bonding, chemical reactions, kinetics, equilibrium, kinetics, thermodynamics, organics, and electrochemistry. The AP Chemistry course will also include 16-20 hands-on laboratory investigations which are comparable to introductory college-level general chemistry laboratories, with a minimum of four laboratory investigations per quarter. Each student will compile and maintain a lab notebook or portfolio of lab reports that can be used to demonstrate the level of rigor of this AP Chemistry course to colleges and universities. This course is authorized by the College Board’s Advanced Placement program. Textbook: Title: Chemistry: The Central Science, 12th ed. Authors: Brown, Lemay, Bursten, Murray and Woodward Publisher: Pearson Higher Learning, 2011 Units of Study: 1      Introduction: Matter and Measurement 2      Atoms, Molecules, and Ions 3      Stoichiometry: Calculations with Chemical Formulas and Equations 4      Reactions in Aqueous Solution 5      Thermochemistry 6      Electronic Structure of Atoms 7      Periodic Properties of the Elements 8      Basic Concepts of Chemical Bonding 9      Molecular Geometry and Bonding Theories 10   Gases 11   Liquids and Intermolecular Forces 12   Solids and Modern Materials 13   Properties of Solutions 14   Chemical Kinetics 15   Chemical Equilibrium 16   Acid-Base Equilibria 17   Additional Aspects of Aqueous Equilibria 18   Chemical Thermodynamics 19   Electrochemistry 20   Nuclear Chemistry 21   Chemistry of the Nonmetals 22   Transition Metals and Coordination Chemistry 23   The Chemistry of Life: Organic ad Biological Chemistry  
Environmental Science
  Environmental Science is a curriculum designed to introduce students to major ecological concepts and the environmental problems that affect the world in which we live. There is an urgent need for environmental education. This course provides one way in which students can become aware of the interactions of people and their environment. The curriculum focuses on concepts that are real-life issues, including relevant laboratory investigations. The course promotes awareness and understaUntnding of practical every day problems that affect society. It also relates important environmental issues to the lives of the students and their families. Students have the use of the school’s 42 acres for experiential investigations including a creek, garden and compost. Textbook: Title: Environmental Science: Understanding our Changing Earth Authors: The American Geological Institute, P. Patrick Leahy, Editor Publisher: Cengage Learning, 2010 Units of Study: Unit 1: Earth and its environments Unit 2: Living at Earth system interfaces Unit 3: Living with a dynamic Earth Unit 4: Depending on the Earth

Social Studies

Social Studies 7
Course Description: This course will provide students with knowledge and skills essential to understanding and thinking critically about world history.  Students will examine ancient civilizations and compare the geographic forces, economies, political systems, cultural achievements, technological advancements, and social relations evident in civilizations representing diverse geographic locations and a range of eras.  The evolution of early civilizations to the Middle Ages leads to a more concentrated focus on the events occurring in Europe, which cause global expansion into other parts of the world. Textbook: Title: World History: Ancient Civilizations through the Renaissance Author: S. Burstein & R. Shek Publisher: Holt McDougal, 2012 Units of Study: Unit 1
  • Prehistory
  • Ancient Egypt
  • Ancient Mesopotamia
  • Ancient India
  • Ancient China
  • Ancient Hebrews
Unit 2
  • Ancient Greece
  • Ancient Rome
  • Ancient Africa
  • The Islamic World
Unit 3
  • East Asia
  • The Early Americas
  • The Middle Ages
Unit 4
  • Renaissance and Reformation
  • Exploration
Breakdown of Units: Unit 1
  • Prehistory
      • General Terms
      • Stone Age and Ice Ages
      • Prehistoric Man – Neanderthal and Cro-Magnon
      • Four River Valleys and Fertile Crescent
  • Ancient Egypt
    • Pharaohs and Royal Women
    • Religion – Death and the Afterlife
    • Daily Life and Appearance
    • Nile River and Papyrus
    • Architecture and Ancient Cities
    • Kush and its ties to Egypt
  • Ancient Mesopotamia
    • Sumer
    • Babylonians – Hammurabi’s Code
    • Hittites and Assyrians
    • Chaldeans – Nebuchadnezzar
    • Phoenicians
  • Ancient India
    • Harappan and Indo-Aryan Civilizations
    • Hinduism
    • Buddhism
    • Mauryan and Gupta Dynasties
  • Ancient China
    • Geography and Natural Barriers
    • Xia Dynasty
    • Shang Dyansty
    • Zhou Dynasty
    • Three Philosophies – Confucianism, Daoism, Legalism
    • Qin Dyansty – Great Wall
    • Han Dynasty – Silk Road
    • Inventions
  • Ancient Hebrews
    • Historical overview
    • Beliefs – Ancient and Modern
Unit 2
  • Ancient Greece
    • Geography
    • Trojan War
    • Religion and Myths
    • Government and Literature
    • Athens and Sparta
    • Persian and Peloponnesian Wars
    • Golden Age
    • Great Greeks – Leaders, Thinkers, Writers
  • Ancient Rome
    • Geography and the Founding of Rome
    • Early Rome and Government
    • Punic Wars
    • Religion and Myths
    • Emperors and Empire
    • Society and Culture
    • Rise of Christianity
    • The Fall of Rome
  • Ancient Africa
    • Geography
    • Empires – Ghana, Mali, Songhai, Great Zimbabwe
    • Kush and Aksum
    • Culture – Folk Tales and Ashanti Proverbs
  • The Islamic World
    • Geography
    • Islamic Beliefs and Practices
    • Empires and Rulers
Unit 3
  • East Asia
    • China – Isolationism, Yuan and Ming Dynasties
    • Mongols – Genghis Khan and Kublai Kahn
    • Marco Polo
    • Japan – Government and Culture
    • Japanese Religions – Shinto and Zen
  • The Early Americas
    • Geography
    • South American Civilizations – Maya, Aztec, Inca
    • North American Mound Builders
    • North American Tribes by Region
  • The Middle Ages
    • Geography
    • The Franks and Charlemagne
    • Wars and the Growth of Nations
    • Power Struggle in England and France
    • Church Problems – Crusades and the Spanish Inquisition
    • King John and the Magna Carta
    • Feudalism and Knights
    • Culture and Daily Life
Unit 4
  • Renaissance  and Reformation
    • Italian Renaissance
    • Humanism and Art
    • Reformation and Protestantism
    • Henry VIII
    • Scientific Revolution
  • Exploration
    • Voyages of the Explorers
    • The New World
Social Studies 8
Eighth Grade Social Studies at CTA continues the sequence of Social Studies with an in-depth study of the early years of our country. While students are studying the development of the United States from the Pre-Columbian era through the Reconstruction, the course focuses on the geographic settings, economic implications, governmental developments, and the role of citizens in shaping our world today.  Consistent with the State of Ohio educational standards, the course will focus on development of The Constitution as it pertains to both the historical events leading up to the Civil War as well as those aspects that continue to impact the world today. Textbook with student online access: Title: United States History, Beginnings to 1877 Publisher: Holt McDougal Units of Study:
  1. History:  Students will explore the narrative history of the development of the United States from Pre-Columbian to the Reconstruction of the Civil War
  2. Geography: Students will study of how physical characteristics of the environment that influenced population distribution, settlement patterns, and economic activities in the United States.
  3. Economics: Students will analyze the economic structures that shaped the United States, including, colonialism, mercantilism, and industrialization.
  4. Government: Students will study of the events and ideas that shaped the continuing development of the United States Constitution.
  5. Citizenship and Responsibility: Through an ongoing exploration of the relationship between participating in civic and political life and the attainment of individual and public goals, students will study the obligations and rights of the citizen in a free market society.
Modern World History
This course is required for graduation and is aligned closely with the State standards for Modern World History. Students will examine world events from 1600 to the present. They will explore the impact of the democratic and industrial revolutions, the forces that led to world domination by European powers, the wars that changed empires, and the ideas that led to independence movements and the effects of global interdependence. The concepts of historical thinking introduced in earlier grades continue to build with students locating and analyzing primary and secondary sources from multiple perspectives to draw conclusions. Textbook: Title: Modern World History Author: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company, 201 Units of Study: Unit 1 – Historical Thinking & Skills Unit 2 – Age of Enlightenment (1600-1800) Unit 3 – Age of Revolutions (1750-1914) Unit 4 – Imperialism (1800-1914) Unit 5 – Achievements & Crises (1900-1945) Unit 6 – The Cold War (1945-1991) (covered only if time permits) Unit 7 – Globalization (1991-Present) (covered only if time permits) Breakdown of Units: Unit 1 – Historical Thinking & Skills Students apply skills by utilizing a variety of resources to construct theses and support or refute contentions made by others. Alternative explanations of historical events are analyzed and questions of historical inevitability are explored. Content Statements:
  1. Historical events provide opportunities to examine alternative courses of action.
  2. The use of primary and secondary sources of information includes an examination of the credibility of each source.
  3. Historians develop theses and use evidence to support or refute positions.
  4. Historians analyze cause, effect, sequence, and correlation in historical events, including multiple causation and long- and short-term causal relations.
  Unit 2 – Age of Enlightenment (1600-1800) The Age of Enlightenment developed from the Scientific Revolution of the 16th and 17th centuries. A new focus on reasoning was used to understand social, political and economic institutions.   Content Statements:
  1. The Scientific Revolution impacted religious, political, and cultural institutions by challenging how people viewed the world.
  2. Enlightenment thinkers applied reason to discover natural laws guiding human nature in social, political and economic systems and institutions.
  3. Enlightenment ideas challenged practices related to religious authority, absolute rule and mercantilism.
  Unit 3 – Age of Revolutions (1750-1914) The Age of Revolutions was a period of two world-encompassing and interrelated developments: the democratic revolution and the industrial revolution. Both had political, economic and social consequences on a global scale.   Content Statements:
  1. Enlightenment ideas on the relationship of the individual and the government influenced the American Revolution, French Revolution and Latin American wars for independence.
  2. Industrialization had social, political and economic effects on Western Europe and the world.
  Unit 4 – Imperialism (1800-1914) The industrialized nations embarked upon a competition for overseas empires that had profound implications for the entire world. This “new imperialism” focused on the underdeveloped world and led to the domination and exploitation of Asia, Africa and Latin America.   Content Statements:
  1. Imperial expansion had political, economic and social roots.
  2. Imperialism involved land acquisition, extraction of raw materials, spread of Western values and direct political control.
  3. The consequences of imperialism were viewed differently by the colonizers and the colonized.
  Unit 5 – Achievements & Crises (1900-1945) The first half of the 20th century was one of rapid technological advances. It was a period when the tensions between industrialized nations resulted in World War I and set the stage for World War II. While World War II transformed the balance of world power, it was the most destructive and costly war in terms of human casualties and material resources expended.   Content Statements:
  1. Advances in technology, communication and transportation improved lives, but also had negative consequences.
  2. The causes of World War I included militarism, imperialism, nationalism and alliances.
  3. The consequences of World War I and the worldwide depression set the stage for the Russian Revolution, the rise of totalitarianism, aggressive Axis expansion and the policy of appeasement which in turn led to World War II.
  4. Oppression and discrimination resulted in the Armenian Genocide during World War I and the Holocaust, the state-sponsored mass murder of Jews and other groups, during World War II.
  5. World War II devastated most of Europe and Asia, led to the occupation of Eastern Europe and Japan, and began the atomic age.
  Unit 6 – The Cold War (1945-1991) (covered only if time permits) Conflicting political and economic ideologies after World War II resulted in the Cold War. The Cold War overlapped with the era of decolonization and national liberation.   Content Statements:
  1. The United States and the Soviet Union became superpowers and competed for global influence.
  2. Treaties and agreements at the end of World War II changed national boundaries and created multinational organizations.
  3. Religious diversity, the end of colonial rule and rising nationalism have led to regional conflicts in the Middle East.
  4. Postwar global politics led to the rise of nationalist movements in Africa and Southeast Asia.
  5. Political and social struggles have resulted in expanded rights and freedoms for women and indigenous peoples.
  Unit 7 – Globalization (1991-Present) (covered only if time permits) The global balance of power shifted with the end of the Cold War. Wars, territorial disputes, ethnic and cultural conflicts, acts of terrorism, advances in technology, expansion of human rights, and changes in the global economy present new challenges. Content Statements:
  1. The break-up of the Soviet Union ended the Cold War and created challenges for its former allies, the former Soviet republics, Europe, the United States and the non- aligned world.
  2. Regional and ethnic conflicts in the post-Cold War era have resulted in acts of terrorism, genocide and ethnic cleansing.
  3. Political and cultural groups have struggled to achieve self-governance and self- determination.
  4. Emerging economic powers and improvements in technology have created a more interdependent global economy.
  5. Proliferation of nuclear weapons has created a challenge to world peace.
  6. The rapid increase of global population, coupled with an increase in life expectancy and mass migrations have created societal and governmental challenges.
  7. Environmental concerns, impacted by population growth and heightened by international competition for the world’s energy supplies, have resulted in a new environmental consciousness and a movement for the sustainability of the world’s resources.
American History
Course Description: This course is required for graduation and is aligned closely with the State standards for the American History end-of-course exam.  Students will examine the history of the United States of America from 1877 to the present. The federal republic has withstood challenges to its national security and expanded the rights and roles of its citizens. The episodes of its past have shaped the nature of the country today and prepared it to attend to the challenges of tomorrow. Understanding how these events came to pass and their meaning for today’s citizens is the purpose of this course. The concepts of historical thinking introduced in earlier grades continue to build with students locating and analyzing primary and secondary sources from multiple perspectives to draw conclusions. Textbook: Title: History Alive! Pursuing American Ideals Author: Teachers' Curriculum Institute Publisher: Teachers' Curriculum Institute, 2013 Units of Study: Unit 1 – Historical Thinking & Skills Unit 2 – Historic Documents Unit 3 – Industrialization & Progressivism (1877-1920) Unit 4 – Foreign Affairs from Imperialism To Post-World War I (1898-1930) Unit 5 – Prosperity, Depression & the New Deal (1919-1941) Unit 6 – From Isolation to World War (1930-1945) Unit 7 – The Cold War (1945-1991) Unit 8 – Social Transformations in The United States (1945-1994) Unit 9 – United States & The Post-Cold War World (1991 To Present) Breakdown of Units: Unit 1 – Historical Thinking & Skills Students apply skills by utilizing a variety of resources to construct theses and support or refute contentions made by others. Alternative explanations of historical events are analyzed and questions of historical inevitability are explored.   Content Statements:
  1. Historical events provide opportunities to examine alternative courses of action.
  2. The use of primary and secondary sources of information includes an examination of the credibility of each source.
  3. Historians develop theses and use evidence to support or refute positions.
  4. Historians analyze cause, effect, sequence and correlation in historical events, including multiple causation and long- and short-term causal relations.
Unit 2 – Historic Documents Some documents in American history have considerable importance for the development of the nation. Students use historical thinking to examine key documents which form the basis for the United States of America.   Content Statements:
  1. The Declaration of Independence reflects an application of Enlightenment ideas to the grievances of British subjects in the American colonies.
  2. The Northwest Ordinance addressed a need for government in the Northwest Territory and established precedents for the future governing of the United States.
  3. Problems facing the national government under the Articles of Confederation led to the drafting of the Constitution of the United States. The framers of the Constitution applied ideas of Enlightenment in conceiving the new government.
  4. The Federalist Papers and the Anti-Federalist Papers structured the national debate over the ratification of the Constitution of the United States.
  5. The Bill of Rights is derived from English law, ideas of the Enlightenment, the experiences of the American colonists, early experiences of self-government and the national debate over the ratification of the Constitution of the United States.
Unit 3 – Industrialization & Progressivism (1877-1920) Ignited by post-Civil War demand and fueled by technological advancements, large-scale industrialization began in the United States during the late 1800s. Growing industries enticed foreign immigration, fostered urbanization, gave rise to the American labor movement and developed the infrastructure that facilitated the settling of the West. A period of progressive reform emerged in response to political corruption and practices of big business. Content Statements:
  1. The rise of corporations, heavy industry, mechanized farming and technological innovations transformed the American economy from an agrarian to an increasingly urban industrial society.
  2. The rise of industrialization led to a rapidly expanding workforce. Labor organizations grew amidst unregulated working conditions, laissez-faire policies toward big business, and violence toward supporters of organized labor.
  3. Immigration, internal migration and urbanization transformed American life.
  4. Following Reconstruction, old political and social structures reemerged and racial discrimination was institutionalized.
  5. The Progressive era was an effort to address the ills of American society stemming from industrial capitalism, urbanization and political corruption.
Unit 4 – Foreign Affairs from Imperialism To Post-World War I (1898-1930) The industrial and territorial growth of the United States fostered expansion overseas. Greater involvement in the world set the stage for American participation in World War I and attempts to preserve post-war peace. Content Statements:
  1. As a result of overseas expansion, the Spanish-American War and World War I, the United States emerged as a world power.
  2. After WWI, the United States pursued efforts to maintain peace in the world. However, as a result of the national debate over the Versailles Treaty ratification and the League of Nations, the United States moved away from the role of world peacekeeper and limited its involvement in international affairs.
Unit 5 – Prosperity, Depression & the New Deal (1919-1941) The post-World War I period was characterized by economic, social and political turmoil. Post- war prosperity brought about changes to American popular culture. However, economic disruptions growing out the war years led to worldwide depression. The United States attempted to deal with the Great Depression through economic programs created by the federal government. Content Statements:
  1. Racial intolerance, anti-immigrant attitudes and the Red Scare contributed to social unrest after World War I.
  2. An improved standard of living for many, combined with technological innovations in communication, transportation and industry, resulted in social and cultural changes and tensions.
  3. Movements such as the Harlem Renaissance, African-American migration, women’s suffrage and Prohibition all contributed to social change.
  4. The Great Depression was caused, in part, by the federal government’s monetary policies, stock market speculation, and increasing consumer debt. The role of the federal government expanded as a result of the Great Depression.
Unit 6 – From Isolation to World War (1930-1945) The isolationist approach to foreign policy meant U.S. leadership in world affairs diminished after World War I. Overseas, certain nations saw the growth of tyrannical governments which reasserted their power through aggression and created conditions leading to the Second World War. After Pearl Harbor, the United States entered World War II, which changed the country’s focus from isolationism to international involvement. Content Statements:
  1. During the 1930s, the U.S. government attempted to distance the country from earlier interventionist policies in the Western Hemisphere as well as retain an isolationist approach to events in Europe and Asia until the beginning of WWII.
  2. The United States mobilization of its economic and military resources during World War II brought significant changes to American society.
Unit 7 – The Cold War (1945-1991) The United States and the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (U.S.S.R.) emerged as the two strongest powers in international affairs. Ideologically opposed, they challenged one another in a series of confrontations known as the Cold War. The costs of this prolonged contest weakened the U.S.S.R. so that it collapsed due to internal upheavals as well as American pressure. The Cold War had social and political implications in the United States. Content Statements:
  1. Use of atomic weapons changed the nature of war, altered the balance of power and began the nuclear age.
  2. The United States followed a policy of containment during the Cold War in response to the spread of communism.
  3. The Second Red Scare and McCarthyism reflected Cold War fears in American society.
  4. The Cold War and conflicts in Korea and Vietnam influenced domestic and international politics.
  5. The collapse of communist governments in Eastern Europe and the U.S.S.R. brought an end to the Cold War.
Unit 8 – Social Transformations in The United States (1945-1994) A period of post-war prosperity allowed the United States to undergo fundamental social change. Adding to this change was an emphasis on scientific inquiry, the shift from an industrial to a technological/service economy, the impact of mass media, the phenomenon of suburban and Sun Belt migrations, the increase in immigration and the expansion of civil rights. Content Statements:
  1. Following World War II, the United States experienced a struggle for racial and gender equality and the extension of civil rights.
  2. The postwar economic boom, greatly affected by advances in science, produced epic changes in American life.
  3. The continuing population flow from cities to suburbs, the internal migrations from the Rust Belt to the Sun Belt, and the increase in immigration resulting from passage of the 1965 Immigration Act have had social and political effects.
  4. Political debates focused on the extent of the role of government in the economy, environmental protection, social welfare and national security.
Unit 9 – United States & The Post-Cold War World (1991 To Present) The United States emerged from the Cold War as a dominant leader in world affairs amidst a globalized economy, political terrorism and the proliferation of nuclear weapons. Content Statements:
  1. Improved global communications, international trade, transnational business organizations, overseas competition and the shift from manufacturing to service industries have impacted the American economy.
  2. The United States faced new political, national security and economic challenges in the post-Cold War world and following the attacks on September 11, 2001.
American Government
This course is required for graduation and is aligned closely with the State standards for the American Government end-of-course exam. We  examine how the American people govern themselves at national, state and local levels of government. Students can understand and begin to influence issues addressed by federal, state, and, local governments through personal service, and research projects. Textbook: Title: American Government 10th edition Author: Wilson & Dilulio Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Company Units of Study: Unit 1 – Civic Involvement Unit 2 – Civic Participation and Skills Unit 3 – Basic Principles of the U.S. Constitution Unit 4 – Structure and Functions of the Federal Government Unit 5 – Role of the People Unit 6 – Ohio’s State and Local Governments Unit 7 – Public Policy Unit 8 – Government and the Economy Breakdown of Units: Unit 1 – Civic Involvement Students can engage societal problems and participate in opportunities to contribute to the common good through governmental and nongovernmental channels.   Content Statements:
  1. Opportunities for civic engagement with the structures of government are made possible through political and public policy processes.
  2. Political parties, interest groups and the media provide opportunities for civic involvement through various means.
  Unit 2 – Civic Participation and Skills Democratic government is enhanced when individuals exercise the skills to effectively participate in civic affairs.   Content Statements:
  1. Issues can be analyzed through the critical use of information from public records, surveys, research data and policy positions of advocacy groups.
  2. The processes of persuasion, compromise, consensus building and negotiation contribute to the resolution of conflicts and differences.
Unit 3 – Basic Principles of the U.S. Constitution Principles related to representative democracy are reflected in the articles and amendments of the U.S. Constitution and provide structure for the government of the United States. Content Statements:
  1. As the supreme law of the land, the U.S. Constitution incorporates basic principles which help define the government of the United States as a federal republic including its structure, powers and relationship with the governed.
  2. The Federalist Papers and the Anti-Federalist Papers framed the national debate over the basic principles of government encompassed by the Constitution of the United States.
  3. Constitutional government in the United States has changed over time as a result of amendments to the U.S. Constitution, Supreme Court decisions, legislation and informal practices.
  4. The Bill of Rights was drafted in response to the national debate over the ratification of the Constitution of the United States.
  5. The Reconstruction Era prompted Amendments 13 through 15 to address the aftermath of slavery and the Civil War.
  6. Amendments 16 through 19 responded to calls for reform during the Progressive Era.
  7. Four amendments have provided for extensions of suffrage to disenfranchised groups.
  8. Five amendments have altered provisions for presidential election, terms, and succession to address changing historical circumstances.
  9. Amendments 11, 21 and 27 have addressed unique historical circumstances.
Unit 4 – Structure and Functions of the Federal Government Three branches compose the basic structure of the federal government. Public policy is created through the making of laws, the execution of the laws and the adjudication of disputes under the laws. Content Statements:
  1. Law and public policy are created and implemented by three branches of government; each functions with its own set of powers and responsibilities.
  2. The political process creates a dynamic interaction among the three branches of government in addressing current issues.
Unit 5 – Role of the People The government of the United States protects the freedoms of its people and provides opportunities for citizens to participate in the political process. Content Statements:
  1. In the United States, people have rights which protect them from undue governmental interference. Rights carry responsibilities which help define how people use their rights and which require respect for the rights of others.
  2. Historically, the United States has struggled with majority rule and the extension of minority rights. As a result of this struggle, the government has increasingly extended civil rights to marginalized groups and broadened opportunities for participation.
  Unit 6 – Ohio’s State and Local Governments The State of Ohio acts within the framework of the U.S. Constitution and extends powers and functions to local governments. Content Statements:
  1. The Ohio Constitution was drafted in 1851 to address difficulties in governing the state of Ohio.
  2. As a framework for the state, the Ohio Constitution complements the federal structure of government in the United States.
  3. Individuals in Ohio have a responsibility to assist state and local governments as they address relevant and often controversial problems that directly affect their communities.
Unit 7 – Public Policy Federal, state and local governments address problems and issues by making decisions, creating laws, enforcing regulations and taking action. Content Statements:
  1. A variety of entities within the three branches of government, at all levels, address public policy issues which arise in domestic and international affairs.
  2. Individuals and organizations play a role within federal, state and local governments in helping to determine public (domestic and foreign) policy.
Unit 8 – Government and the Economy The actions of government play a major role in the flow of economic activity. Governments consume and produce goods and services. Fiscal and monetary policies, as well as economic regulations, provide the means for government intervention in the economy. Content Statements:
  1. The federal government uses spending and tax policy to maintain economic stability and foster economic growth. Regulatory actions carry economic costs and benefits.
  2. The Federal Reserve System uses monetary tools to regulate the nation’s money supply and moderate the effects of expansion and contraction in the economy.
Economics & Financial Literacy
This course is required for graduation and is aligned closely with the State standards for Economics and Financial Literacy. The course explores the fundamentals that guide individuals and nations as they make choices about how to use limited resources to satisfy their wants. More specifically, it examines the ability of individuals to use knowledge and skills to manage limited financial resources effectively for a lifetime of financial security. Textbook: Title: Economics Principles in Action Publisher: Pearson, 2013 Units of Study: Unit 1 - Economic Decision Making & Skills Unit 2 - Fundamentals of Economics Unit 3 - Government & the Economy Unit 4 - Global Economy Unit 5 - Working & Earning   Breakdown of Units: Unit 1 - Economic Decision Making & Skills Economic decision making relies on the analysis of data. Economists use data to explain trends and decide among economic alternatives. Individuals use data to determine the condition of their finances and to make savings and investment decisions. Content Statements:
  1. Economists analyze multiple sources of data to predict trends, make inferences and arrive at conclusions.
  2. Reading financial reports (bank statements, stock market reports, mutual fund statements) enables individuals to make and analyze decisions about personal finances.
  Unit 2 - Fundamentals of Economics Productive resources are limited and allocated in a variety of different ways. An efficient way to allocate productive resources is through markets. Content Statements:
  1. People cannot have all the goods and services they want and, as a result, must choose some things and give up others.
  2. Different economic systems (traditional, market, command, and mixed) utilize different methods to allocate limited resources.
  3. Markets exist when consumers and producers interact. When supply or demand changes, market prices adjust. Those adjustments send signals and provide incentives to consumers and producers to change their own decisions.
  4. Competition among sellers lowers costs and prices, and encourages producers to produce more of what consumers are willing and able to buy. Competition among buyers increases prices and allocates goods and services to those people who are willing and able to pay the most for them.
Unit 3 - Government & the Economy The health of a nation’s economy is influenced by governmental policy. Fiscal policy can be used to spur economic growth. Monetary policy can be used to moderate fluctuations in the business cycle. Content Statements:
  1. A nation’s overall level of economic well-being is determined by the interaction of spending and production decisions made by all households, firms, government agencies and others in the economy. Economic wellbeing can be assessed by analyzing economic indicators gathered by the government.
  2. Economic policy decisions made by governments result in both intended and unintended consequences.
  Unit 4 - Global Economy Global issues and events influence economic activities.   Content Statements:
  1. When regions and nations use comparative advantage to produce at the lowest cost and then trade with others, production, consumption and interdependence increase.
  2. Government actions, such as tariffs, quotas, subsidies, trade agreements and membership in multinational economic organizations, significantly impact international trade.
  Unit 5 - Working & Earning Employment provides a means of creating personal income. Content Statements:
  1. Income is determined by many factors including individual skills and abilities, work ethic and market conditions.
  2. Employee earning statements include information about gross wages, benefits, taxes and other deductions.
Contemporary Global Issues / Model United Nations
Course Description: This course is a senior elective and is aligned closely with the State standards for Contemporary World Issues. The dynamics of global interactions among nations and regions present issues that affect all humanity. These dynamics include: competing beliefs and goals; methods of engagement; and conflict and cooperation. Contemporary issues have political, economic, social, historic and geographic components. Approaches to addressing global and regional issues reflect historical influences and multiple perspectives. Students can understand and begin to influence global issues through personal service and research projects, as well as through participation in the Yeshiva University Model United Nations. Textbook: Various articles and periodicals Units of Study: Unit 1 - Global Connections Unit 2 - Civic Participation and Skills Unit 3 - Civil and Human Rights Unit 4 - Social Institutions Breakdown of Units: Unit 1 - Global Connections The 21st century is characterized by changing circumstances as new economies emerge and new technologies change the way people interact. Issues related to health, economics, security and the environment are universal.   Content Statements:
  1. Trade, alliances, treaties and international organizations contribute to the increasing interconnectedness of nations and peoples in the 21st century.
  2. Advances in communications technology have profound effects on the ability of governments, interest groups, individuals and the media to share information across national and cultural borders.
  Unit 2 - Civic Participation and Skills Individuals and groups have the capacity to engage with others to impact global issues.   Content Statements:
  1. Individuals can evaluate media messages that are constructed using particular tools, characteristics and conventions for unique purposes. Different communication methods affect how people define and act on issues.
  2. Individuals can assess how effective communicators address diverse audiences.
  3. Individuals can identify, assess and evaluate world events, engage in deliberative civil debate and influence public processes to address global issues.
  4. Effective civic participation involves identifying problems or dilemmas, proposing appropriate solutions, formulating action plans, and assessing the positive and negative results of actions taken.
  5. Individuals can participate through non-governmental organizations to help address humanitarian needs.
  Unit 3 - Civil and Human Rights There are challenges to civil rights and human rights throughout the world. Politics, economics and culture can all influence perceptions of civil and human rights.   Content Statements:
  1. Beliefs about civil and human rights vary among social and governmental systems.
  2. Nations and international organizations pursue their own interests on issues related to civil and human rights, resulting in both conflict and cooperation particularly as it relates to injustices against minority groups.
  3. Modern instances of genocide and ethnic cleansing present individual, organizational and national issues related to the responsibilities of participants and non-participants.
  Unit 4 - Social Institutions Civilizations adopt and adapt social institutions to address challenges and meet the goals of decision makers in a society. Content Statements:
  1. Non-Governmental organizations often play a leading role in addressing issues of special interest.
  2. Governments and NGO’s identify priorities differently and have different, often opposing interests.

Other

Film Studies
Many historians have noted two watershed events of the second millennia. The first was the invention of the printing press. The second was the development of visual and audio recording technology. Although there have been many stepping stones to this latter event, including Da Vinci's camera obscura in 1558, this revolution has been largely one of the past hundred years. To be sure, the production of moving pictures has and will continue to influence our lives--our culture, our economy, our values. In fact, as the revolution continues and as the means of production becomes more widely accessible, film today has arrived as a major medium for political and artistic expression. This course will explore how the revolution of film developed, both as an art and an industry, as well as to participate the very means of film production. Texts: Title: Introducing Film Author: Grant Roberts and Heather Wallis Publisher: Arnold Press Title: Screenplay: The Foundations of Screenwriting Author: Syd Field Publisher: Delta Units of Study:
  1. Film History: Students are responsible for screening selected historical films among the below units which pertain to Introducing Film as well as other film history and production lectures. Film history units include:
  1. The Silent Era
  2. Classics
  3. Genre Studies
  4. The Documentary
  5. Foreign and Israeli Films
  1. Film Production: Students are responsible for completing quarterly checklists for film production, including the production of a video for the Scholarship Dinner as well as other highly public events. Learning the cutting edge software Final Cut X and Motion are amazing opportunities for students anywhere, and CTA film studies students are privileged to have such an opportunity. As a student you have at your command the equipment used by professionals across the industry, even in Hollywood. Through active utilization and tutoring, you can make this course as big as your imagination will allow. Film Production units include:
  1. Mise en scene
  2. Cinematography
  3. Editing(Using Final Cut X)
Digital Media
Digital Media is an introduction to various graphic digital content creation applications and to website/blog production. Through the creation, implementation, and development of their own website/blog, students will engage world, as well as learn a variety of multimedia software applications for graphic design, info graphics, 3-D animation, and video editing. Through the production of a multimedia website students will explore the dynamic field of digital media. Class time consists of hands-on demonstrations of software and techniques and the workshopping of student work. Students are expected to spend class time discussing and developing their creative project as well as work at home on their assigned work. We will be using primarily free versions of platforms and applications, which provide a limited but ample range of utilization, so students are expected to have/be able to get access to all resources of the course. Units of Study:
  1. Unit I: creating a website
  2. Unit II: basic photoshop
  3. Unit III: Sketchit
  4. Unit IV: Animation on Moovly
Course Outcomes: Students will…
  1. learn basic Photoshop tools
  2. learn basic graphic design and typography
  3. learn digital media terminology
  4. build a website with free web platforms that explores a central theme
  5. creatively communicate ideas through digital content
  6. display ability to create visually and artistically compelling content
  7. gain ability to articulate digital art concepts during discussions and critiques
  8. create content with graphic design applications Tableau Public, Sketchup, Moovly, and Final Cut.
  9. use various social media such as twitter, facebook, reddit, et.al.
Computer Science
This is a semester credit course covering basic computer knowledge and computer skills and coding. Students research the history of computers, the basics of how a computer works and develop their skills using Microsoft Word, PowerPoint and Excel. Internet safety, Internet searches, and proper etiquette and practices online are covered. Students will solve practical problems using basic logic in Excel and students will use HTML code to create a personal web page. Students will learn the basic elements of coding with an introduction to Python, Python with Turtle and R programming languages. Texts: No texts will be used for this course – only online materials. Units of Study:
  1. Computer History
  2. Binary system
  3. Networks and the Internet, URLs, ISP
  4. Internet safety and copyright issues
  5. Internet site reliability
  6. Database formulas and macros in Excel
  7. Hyperlinks with Microsoft products
  8. web page development with HTML
  9. Introduction to coding logic with Python programming language
  10. Introduction to coding graphics with Python Turtle
  11. Introduction to R programming language for statistical analysis
Skill Objectives: Students will:
  1. Develop an appreciation for the internal workings of the computer.
  2. Use Microsoft software to solve project problems.
  3. Use Microsoft software as a communication and presentation tool.
  4. Refine research skills using the Internet.
  5. Know what makes a web site reliable.
  6. Understand how a web page is created.
  7. Understand the basics of coding a computer using Python and R.
7th Grade Art
The 7th Grade art curriculum is centered on the Elements of Art and the Principles of Design. These are the basic “building blocks” of art-making. The purpose of this class is for students to gain an understanding of artistic processes and media (art materials) through hands-on projects incorporating the Elements & Principles. In this class, students will explore many aspects of art through class discussions, investigating other artists’ work throughout art history, and studio art-making projects. Students will create projects in 2-D design, drawing/sketching from observation, abstract art, printmaking and sculpture. Each project connects with a key Element or Principle in artmaking. In 7th Grade Art, students will also consider why we make certain choices in art and why these choices are important. Texts / Resources: Scholastic Art magazine, videos, posters, art images Units of Study:
  1. What Is Art?/Art Criticism
  2. Line
  3. Value
  4. Color
  5. Space
  6. Unity
10th Grade Art (Art I)
The 10th Grade art curriculum is based on a survey of Art History from ancient times to the present. The purpose of this course is for students to use the framework of art history for creative artmaking in a variety of media. Students will explore key time periods, civilizations, cultures and movements while engaging in projects reflecting the concepts studied. 10th graders will also have the chance to research, plan, and create their own self-designed projects towards the end of the semester. In addition to artmaking, art history, and art criticism, 10th grade students learn how to incorporate reflective practices in to their work. One main component of the curriculum is the 8 Artists Habits of Mind, developed at Harvard, which outline the processes and mindsets artists use in order to be successful. Students will use these habits to assess their own progress throughout the semester. Texts / Resources: Scholastic Art magazine, videos, posters, art images Units of Study:
  1. What Is Art?/Art Criticism
  2. Drawing/Seeing
  3. Intro to Art History
  4. Egyptian Art
  5. Classical Art & Architecture
  6. Art Across Cultures - Radial Design
  7. The Renaissance
  8. Modern Art History Research Project
Art II
The Art II curriculum focuses on building and refining skills as well as emphasizing concepts. Conceptually, students will examine and create art through the lens of “Big Ideas”: broad, overarching themes in art and in life. Students will explore these areas through class discussions, projects, and a bit of research, too. They will work on planning individualized artmaking projects that align with their own specific interests and address the main themes and big ideas. Engaging in art criticism, aesthetics, and reflective practices will enhance students’ artmaking and foster important personal and conceptual connections in their work. One main component of the curriculum is the 8 Artists Habits of Mind, developed at Harvard, which outline the processes and mindsets artists use in order to be successful. Students will use these habits to assess their own progress throughout the semester. Texts / Resources: Scholastic Art magazine, videos, posters, art images Units of Study:
  1. What Is Art?/Art Criticism
  2. Identity/Relationships
  3. Language/Text
  4. Memory
  5. The Environment
Health
This is a comprehensive course that teaches knowledge of the human body, and promotes making healthy decisions for everyday life. Topics include physical fitness, nutrition, body systems, diseases and disorders, mental health, human growth & development, alcohol, tobacco and other drugs. Textbook: Title: Glencoe Health Author: Mary Bronson Publisher: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, 2011 Units of Study
  1. Mental and Emotional Health
    1. Chapter 3: Achieving Mental and Emotional Health
    2. Chapter 4: Managing Stress and coping with loss
    3. Chapter 5: Mental and Emotional Problems
  1. Nutrition and Physical Activity
    1. Chapter 10: Nutrition for health
    2. Chapter 11: Managing weight and eating behaviors
    3. Chapter 12: Physical activity and fitness
  1. Personal Care and Body Systems
    1. Chapter 13: Personal Health care
    2. Chapter 14: Skeletal, Muscular and Nervous Systems
    3. Chapter 15: Cardiovascular, Respiratory, and Digestive System
    4. Chapter 16: Endocrine and Reproductive Health
  1. Human Sexuality: Growth and Development
    1. Chapter 17: Beginning of the life cycle
    2. Chapter 18: The Life Cycle continues
  1. Drugs
    1. Chapter 19: Medicines and drugs
    2. Chapter 20: Tobacco
    3. Chapter 21: Alcohol
    4. Chapter 22: Illegal Drugs
  1. Diseases and Disorders
    1. Chapter 23: Communicable diseases
    2. Chapter 24: Sexually transmitted diseases and HIV/AIDS
    3. Chapter 25: Non-communicable diseases and disabilities